CONTENT-RELATED RESOURCES

  • Annual SDG16 Data Initiative Global Report

    The SDG16 Data Initiative Global Report series aims to evaluate global progress towards realizing the 2030 Agenda’s promise of peaceful, just and inclusive societies. The Global Report provides governments, UN officials, and civil society stakeholders with a resource to help understand progress on SDG16 targets and an evidence base for them to identify gaps and shortcomings in both implementing and monitoring SDG16.

    The 2019 Global Report covers all twelve targets, creating the critical baseline of available data necessary for future substantive analysis. The 2019 Global Report, prepared in light of SDG16’s initial review at the 2019 High-Level Political Forum (HLPF), assess progress made on all twelve targets. Through this review, the 2019 Global Report aims to provide policymakers and civil society actors with pathways forward to improve both SDG16 implementation and data coverage.

  • Article 19 Your right to know: A game to navigate the right to information

    Making information requests can be a tricky game of two steps forward, one steps backwards, everywhere in the world. The right to information gives every person the right to obtain information, documents and data from public bodies and others, without having to give reason. International law has provided States with standards for laws, what are the exemptions and how to appeal in case a request get rejected.  Over 120 countries around the world have adopted comprehensive right to information laws or national policies. This means that 90% of the world’s population lives in a country with a RTI law or policy.

    “Your Right to Know” is a game to help civil society, journalists, activists and others learn to use RTI laws to guarantee their rights, gain knowledge and challenge governments and institutions on key issues.

  • Connections between the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda: The case for policy coherence

    This working paper from the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) is similar to GFMD’s own Media Sustainability Barometer (MSB) in that it draws on the interconnections between the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including SDG 16. This infographic also visualises the interconnection.

  • Empowering Civil Society for National Reporting and Action on SDG16+ Report

    This Empowering Civil Society for National Reporting and Action on SDG16” report (Empowering Civil Society report) — published in partnership by the Transparency, Accountability, and Participation (TAP) Network, Asia Development Alliance (ADA), and Forus, with contributions from CIVICUSCivil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (CSPPS)Global Forum for Media Development (GFMD)Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC)NamatiSaferworld, and Transparency International (TI)—features a compilation of national civil society case studies and civil society spotlight reports on SDG16.

    It provides analysis of a range of approaches and methodologies utilized by civil society for implementation and monitoring of SDG16 by civil society, specifically with regards to drafting and disseminating of spotlight reports. The report also examines gaps, challenges, and opportunities for robust accountability at all levels, and provides key recommendations for enhancing civil society monitoring and action going forward.

  • Enabling the implementation of the 2030 Agenda through SDG16+: Anchoring peace, justice and inclusion

    The report, launched by the Global AllianceEnabling the implementation of the 2030 Agenda through SDG16+: Anchoring peace, justice and inclusion provides an overview of country level actions and progress on SDG 16+ across different regions and development contexts and highlights key trends and findings on SDG 16+ implementation globally.

    The report has been informed by a series of regional multi-stakeholder consultations on SDG 16+, 25 country case studies and draws from evidence of recent research and analysis across SDG 16+ targets.

  • FOIAnet Resources for Right to Information Advocates

    FOIAnet Resources for Right to Information Advocates includes publications, model laws, training materials for the public or public officials, useful links, organisations and other resources related to the right of access to information.

    • SDG 16.10.2 – Measuring RTI implementation – FOIAnet Methodology – Based on the central methodological framework developed in the UNESCO metadata for SDG 16, and given the importance of independent civil society input into the assessment of the achievement of the SDGs, FOIAnet took the initiative to develop a concrete methodology that would guide its members to capture data on SDG 16.10.2 and provide a baseline for following years.
  • GFMD Members' Resources

    • Access to Information and the Sustainable Development Goals Report from Article 19 reviews the current state of the right of access to information across the world to provide a baseline for future assessments over the lifetime of the 2030 Agenda. It finds that there has been significant incorporation of the right in well over half of UN Member States. The right has now been adopted into law or policy in 118 countries around the world (61 percent of UN Member States) from the largest countries (China, India, USA, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Mexico) to some of the smallest (St Vincent and the Grenadines, Vanuatu) covering 89 percent of the world’s population. In addition, 90 countries have adopted explicit constitutional guarantees. Many countries are also implementing transparency initiatives such as e-government or open data which supplement the right but generally do not fully ensure the right of access to all information.
    • Article 19 Infographic: Progress on the right to information around the world
    • The role of the media since the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals by Zoé Titus, Strategic Coordinator of the Namibia Media Trust
    • MDIF’s literature review on Media development’s role in social, economic, and political progress.
  • GFMD SDG16.10 Pilot Projects

    GFMD has launched three pilot projects in collaboration with civil society and media actors in Serbia, Pakistan, and Tanzania aiming to produce shadow reports related to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16.10, which targets public access to information.

    These reports should assist our partners in conducting an assessment of the 16.10.2 indicator “number of countries that adopt and implement constitutional, statutory and/or policy guarantees for public access to information. Moreover, it should encourage governments to complete a review of SDG 16.10 through the Voluntary National Review (VNR) framework.

    In July 2019, under the auspices of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the annual meeting of the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) will enable countries to share progress on the achievement of the SDGs and reveal the outcome of VNRs. It will be an opportunity for partners to present and to disseminate their report related to public access to information around the HLPF as well, notably by holding a side-event.

    The SDG 16.10 project is funded by the German Development and Cooperation Ministry and by Deutsche Welle Akademie. Free Press Unlimited and UNESCO are also engaged in leading a SDG 16.10 shadow report.

  • Goal 16 Advocacy Toolkit

    Recognizing the critical importance of Goal 16 of the 2030 Agenda on peaceful, just and inclusive societies and accountable institutions, the toolkit, established by TAP Network, provides civil society and other nongovernmental stakeholders with guidance on how to engage with their governments and other local, regional or international stakeholders to support the planning, implementation, follow-up and accountability of Goal 16.

  • IFEX's explainer on SDGs: What role for freedom of expression?

    Your State has committed to “ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms”. This is what the Sustainable Development Goal 16.10 affirms. Is your government holding up to its commitment? You can help to monitor its progress – and contribute to it! Check out this 5-minute guide to learn how.

  • Measuring SDG 16.10.2: A Synthesis Report from Centre for Law & Democracy on the FOIAnet

    In 2017, the Freedom of Information Advocates Network (FOIAnet) developed a methodology for parallel civil society reporting on State compliance with Sustainable Development Goal Indicator 16.10.2, which assesses the number of countries that have adopted and implemented access to information guarantees. The Centre for Law and Democracy developed this synthesis report of the FOIAnet methodology as applied by civil society groups in five countries.

  • Media4Democracy resources

    Media4Democracy is an EU-funded Technical Assistance Facility strengthening the European Union Delegations’ ability to implement the EU Human Rights Guidelines on Freedom of Expression Online and Offline. As part of its direct service to the EU Delegations, Media4Democracy provides materials and tools for advocacy, capacity building and to enhance knowledge of a wide range of issues linked to freedom of expression and implementing the EU Guidelines on Freedom of Expression. Some of their resources include:

    • M4D and EUDs Pilot Packages of Technical Assistance Enhancing Support for Freedom of Expression (link)
    • Supporting Access to Information: A Practical Guide for EU Delegations (report)
    • Tools and Resources (link)
  • New America and OECD's SDGs in Order

    SDGs in Order, developed by New America and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), is the first-ever sequence for tackling the most important problems in the world. It ranks the SDG targets based on a survey of 85 developmental economists, political scientists, and social scientists around the world, which asked them to put a cleaned-up list of 117 targets in the right order based on their ability to catalyse and realise the 2030 Agenda. More information is also available here.

  • Practical guidance for civil society reporting on SDG16+

    Since 2015, Saferworld has worked with civil society and governments to translate the 2030 Agenda commitments to peaceful, just and inclusive societies into action.

    For the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be achieved, governments and other stakeholders must be accountable for the commitments agreed in 2015. Reporting by civil society on national progress towards the SDGs is critical for ensuring accountability, and provides an important complement to official accounts of progress.

    This briefing provides practical guidance for civil society organisations to develop independent reports on progress towards the goal of peaceful, just and inclusive societies, referred to as SDG16+. The guidance is in two parts: the first outlines a series of steps for developing a report, and the second proposes a structure for the report’s content.

  • Putting SDG16+ into practice

    Saferworld has worked to support the national adaption of the commitments found in SDG16+ of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies.

    This infographic illustrates how this ‘localisation’ approach works in 11 important steps

  • Rome Civil Society Declaration on SDG16+

    The Rome Declaration is the product of an online consultation promoted amongst the TAP Membership and other civil society networks, as well as deliberations during the Rome Conference Civil Society Day on 26 May 2019, just prior to the Rome SDG16 Conference. The extensive process to draft this resolution was guided by three co-facilitators, including Coco Lammers from Namati, Peter van Sluijs from the Civil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding, and Pascal Richard from the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict.

    The Rome Declaration was adopted and presented by civil society in a statement to Members States, international organizations, and other SDG16+ stakeholders at the Rome SDG16+ Conference on 28 May 2016.

  • SDG Accountability Handbook launched by TAP Network

    The TAP Network introduces the SDG Accountability Handbook: A Practical Guide for Civil Society.

    The SDG Accountability Handbook is a capacity development resource that seeks to support national-level civil society hold their government accountable for 2030 Agenda promises, better understand specific approaches to hold governments accountable for the SDGs, and guide them through the practical steps they can take to improve accountability for the 2030 Agenda in their country.

    It features a variety of distinct approaches civil society can use to monitor and follow-up on SDG implementation, as well as country-specific case studies and key resources and tips.

  • SDG Indicators Metadata repository

    SDG Indicators metadata repository reflects the latest reference metadata information provided by the UN System and other international organisations on data and statistics for the Tier I and II indicators in the global indicator framework. Since Tier III indicators are still under methodological development, a link to the webpage that includes all available work plans is being provided. This repository will be further updated and periodically reviewed in cooperation with the respective data compilers.

  • SDG Resource Centre and Knowledge Hub

    In addition to the main Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) resource centre maintained by the United Nations, the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) also launched the SDG Knowledge Hub to provide an online resource center for news and commentary regarding the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including all 17 SDGs.

  • Shadow report: SDG16 implementation in Latin America

    Together with seven national chapters (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras and Peru) Transparency International prepared independent reports that allow for a different vision from that of the national governments regarding what the challenges are that we must take on in order to achieve the targets that SDG 16 proposes.

    The report focuses mainly on the anti-corruption agenda, specifically targets 16.4 (illicit financial and arms flows), 16.5 (reduce bribery and other forms of corruption) and 16.10 (access to information). This research is based on 175 indicators explicitly developed as part of the global Transparency International project.

    The results can be seen in this report and are owed to the effort of the civil society organizations that have assumed responsibility for the success of the 2030 Agenda. They recognize that this shared responsibility applies to all social actors and that their actions, coordination and synergies can contribute to the success of the targets that we have set, as a society, for the world of tomorrow that we seek to build.

  • Stakeholders Invited to Provide Inputs on SDG16

    An online consultation launched on the UN’s SDG Knowledge Platform seeks to gather inputs from Major Groups and other stakeholders on the SDGs that will be reviewed in depth at the July 2019 session of the UN High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF). A new channel for stakeholder input, the consultation will result in a summary highlighting the main points raised by participants, and for dissemination by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA).

    According to the E-consultation webpage, the consultation, which runs through 8 February 2019, will serve to improve stakeholders’ access to information and promote broad and participatory engagement on the follow-up and review related to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It notes that “concise and straightforward inputs” should be submitted online for a limited number of questions that are proposed for each SDG under review in 2019, notably SDG 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions).

  • State of Access of Information in Africa

    In celebration of International Right to Information Day, the African Platform on Access to Information (APAI) Campaign and fesmedia Africa released a research study on the state of access to information in Africa. Reviewing fourteen countries, and using the expertise and experience of the APAI Working Group Members, the research provides a useful snapshot of the state of access to information on the continent while providing clear and simple summaries and infographics, measured against the APAI Declaration of Principles.
  • Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform

    UN’s Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) serves Member States, Major Groups and other stakeholders, as well as the general public, by providing wide access to information and knowledge for sustainable development, through its online Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform and social media outlets.

    The Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) seeks to provide leadership and catalyse action in promoting and coordinating implementation of internationally agreed development goals, including the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Among other mandates, it hosts the secretariat for the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), the central platform within the United Nations system for the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by Heads of State and Governments in September 2015. The 2030 Agenda is a new plan of action for people, planet and prosperity, with 17 SDGs and 169 associated targets at its core.

    The work of the Division translates into six core functions: (1) Support to UN intergovernmental processes on sustainable development; (2) Analysis and policy development; (3) Capacity development at the request of Member States; (4) Inter-agency coordination; and (5) stakeholder engagement, partnerships, communication and outreach; and (6) Knowledge management.

    • The UN System SDGs action online database is the UN family’s repository of actions, initiatives and plans on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs). It contains information made available by UN system entities. It is searchable and is regularly updated. It serves as a useful reference tool for learning about what UN system entities have been doing in support of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs).
    • The High-level Political Forum, United Nations central platform for follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals, provides for the full and effective participation of all States Members of the United Nations and States members of specialized agencies. The Forum meets annually under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council for eight days, including a three-day ministerial segment and every four years at the level of Heads of State and Government under the auspices of the General Assembly for two days.
    • Sustainable Development Goal 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. Goal 16 will be reviewed in-depth at the high-level political forum in 2019.
    • Handbook for the Preparation of Voluntary National Reviews is a handbook for country preparation and presentation of voluntary national reviews (VNRs). It should be read in conjunction with the updated Secretary-General’s proposal for voluntary common reporting guidelines for voluntary national reviews at the High-level Political Forum on sustainable development (HLPF).
  • Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN)

    Launched by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in August 2012, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) mobilizes scientific and technical expertise from academia, civil society, and the private sector in support of sustainable development problem solving at local, national, and global scales. It aims to accelerate joint learning and help to overcome the compartmentalization of technical and policy work by promoting integrated approaches to the interconnected economic, social, and environmental challenges confronting the world.

  • Strengthening the United Nations' Role in Media Development

    The United Nations made a promise in Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human to promote free and independent media around the world. Citizens cannot “seek, receive and impart information and ideas, through any medium, regardless of frontiers” without access to a vibrant media sphere, including a free and open internet.

    But how does the UN interpret and act upon this obligation? How is that changing? And how can the UN help create a more effective response to the profound challenges confronting independent media?

    The report “Strengthening the United Nations’ Role in Media Development” examines the myriad ways that the agencies and bodies of the United Nations support the development of healthy media systems. Author Bill Orme highlights the role of four UN organizations in particular—UNESCO, UNDP, UNICEF, and DPO—and makes recommendations targeted to these agencies, as well as to UN member states and donors.

  • The SDG 16 Data Initiative

    The SDG16 Data Initiative is a collective project to compile existing global data that can help track progress towards the achievement of SDG16. The recommended UN official indicators along with proposed complementary indicators are listed for each target. We have included a variety of respected data providers and sought to highlight gaps and useful alternative data sources in SDG16 target areas.

    • SDG Data Initiative Global Report aims to evaluate global progress towards realizing the 2030 Agenda’s promise of peaceful, just and inclusive societies. The Global Report provides governments, UN officials, and civil society stakeholders with a resource to help understand progress on SDG16 targets and an evidence base for them to identify gaps and shortcomings in both implementing and monitoring SDG16.
  • The SDG 16 Hub

    The SDG 16 Hub was initiated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in response to an increasing demand for structured and centralised information on SDG 16 and the desire for meaningful and impactful collaboration opportunities.

    The SDG 16 Hub is not a corporate website, but a hub designed to allow all stakeholders with an interest in SDG 16 to learn about the key pillars related to SDG 16, share knowledge, and collaborate. It includes resources on SDG16 that are produced by UN agencies, governments, other stakeholders as well as multi-stakeholder initiatives.

    What does the SDG 16 Hub do?

    The SDG 16 Hub is designed to be a one-stop shop for knowledge and collaboration on SDG 16. It does so by offering the following:

    • KNOWLEDGE: A growing collection of resources on SDG 16 in a searchable database. In addition, users can browse resources by following three key questions: WHAT, WHO, HOW TO.
    • COLLABORATION: The SDG 16 Hub also hosts an interactive space to foster sharing and learning on SDG 16. Sign up today to collaborate with colleagues and partners!
  • Time to invest: how to support action on SDG16+

    Four years into the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 16+ (SDG16+), the picture is not encouraging. Efforts to mobilise action and generate investments for SDG16+ have fallen short and, unless something changes, will fail to achieve the global commitment to building more peaceful, just and inclusive societies by 2030.

    But as Saferworld shows in its latest briefing, with a coherent approach and focused action there is still time to turn the situation around. Although many of the issues that fall under SDG16+ are complex and politically sensitive, there are a number of lessons and successes that will help practitioners better understand how to effectively support action on SDG16+.

    This briefing focuses on:

    • the different ways that donors and policymakers can support action on SDG16+
    • a review of where and how support has been provided so far
    • the need for a more balanced and concerted approach to supporting action on SDG16+
    • how to enable action on SDG16+ at the national and sub-national level
  • Tracking progress on Sustainable Development Goal 16 with Global State of Democracy Indices

    This GSoD In Focus provides an overview of the progress in implementing Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16 in the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, by using the Global State of Democracy (GSoD) Indices as complementary data to the official indicators. It does so based on the assumption that democracy has an instrumental value, as an enabler of sustainable development (International IDEA 2018: 5–9).

    Although the GSoD Indices pertain to a total of nine SDGs (International IDEA 2019b), this GSoD In Focus zooms in on the progress on SDG 16 (Peace, justice and accountable institutions) at the global, regional and country levels. The data presented contributes to the current debate on inclusion, equal treatment and participation, which coincides with this year’s theme of the UN International Democracy Day, as advocated by the UN Secretary-General, António Guterres. This GSoD In Focus is published on 15 September as a contribution by International IDEA to marking this day.

  • UNDP’s Engagement with the Media for Governance, Sustainable Development and Peace

    The past few decades have seen a global revolution in the ways in which people access, consume and share information. New challenges and opportunities brought about by these transformations now intersect with longer-standing challenges to media pluralism, freedom and independence. Featuring 13 new country case studies, this report highlights the diverse scope, successes and lessons of UNDP’s recent engagement with the media for promoting inclusive governance, sustainable development and peace.

  • UNESCO's Approach to SDGs

    UNESCO’s work contributes to Goal 16 of promoting peaceful and inclusive societies, ensuring public access to information and protecting fundamental freedoms. UNESCO’s approach to media development is both knowledge-driven and context-sensitive, and it takes into account the challenges and opportunities created by the rapidly changing media environment. IPDC’s Special Initiative on Knowledge-Driven Media Development highlights the importance of generating and sharing of knowledge to advance media development, and has special relevance to an inclusive approach to strengthening journalism education worldwide. This initiative contributes to Goal 16. We also encourage you to review UNESCO’s Media Development Indicators (MDIs), which includes multiple resources related to access to information and other SDG 16-related measures.

GFMD MEMBERS & PARTNERS

  • ARTICLE 19

    Article 19 focuses on resources such as the right to information (RTI).

    RTI enables the public and civil society to access information held by public bodies, and empowers them to hold their leaders accountable, develop a fuller understanding of the world, and ensure other human rights. The right to information is an important tool for holding governments to account, as it requires them to be more transparent in their activities, for example in the way they spend public finances.  This not only helps fight corruption, but it helps build stable and resilient democracies, where the powerful are genuinely accountable. The protection of whistleblowers to be able to reveal information of public interest is also crucially important.

    Over the past 15 years, global progress on access to information, both in law and practice, has been significant. Nearly 120 countries around the world have adopted comprehensive RTI laws, encompassing nearly 90 percent of the world’s population. These laws have been extensively used to enable people to achieve their social and economic, as well as their human rights. However, there remains a long way to go to instill genuine transparency and protect the right to information for all.

  • Balkan Investigative Reporting Network | BIRN

    Key issues in the Balkans that BIRN has identified include lack of freedom of expression, loss of media independence, lack of good governance, an absence of anti-corruption efforts, poor access to justice and rights and civil society organisations’ inability to address issues of public interest.

    To address those issues, the Network implements a range of programmes and projects focused on training journalists, publishing and broadcasting; monitoring, advocating and debating; working with CSOs as well as creating public archives and databases.

    BIRN targets a wide range of stakeholders, from the general public, journalists and media in general, to decision makers, both national and international, and civil society organisations.

  • Center for Law and Democracy | CLD

    The Centre for Law and Democracy believes in a world in which robust respect for all human rights underpins strong participatory democracy at all levels of governance – local, national, regional and international – leading to social justice and equality.

    The Centre for Law and Democracy works to promote, protect and develop those human rights which serve as the foundation for or underpin democracy, including the rights to freedom of expression, to vote and participate in governance, to access information and to freedom of assembly and association.

  • Deustche Welle Akademie | DW-A

    DWA believes that independent media and responsible journalism are essential worldwide. Given Germany’s history, they believe that people should be able to freely express their views and have access to independent sources of information. DWA considers this to be an important prerequisite for peace and democracy.

    They support the development of independent, transparent media systems, quality journalism and media expertise. They help rebuild media in post-crisis and post-conflict environments and contribute internationally to the professional training of media workers.

  • Free Press Unlimited | FPU

    Free Press Unlimited believes that objective information can be of life-and-death importance. Free Press Unlimited helps local journalists in war zones and conflict areas to provide their audience with trustworthy news and information. The information that people need to survive and give shape to their own future.

  • Pakistan Press Foundation | PPF

    Pakistan Press Foundation (PPF) is an independent media documentation and training centre, non-governmental organisation committed to promoting and defending freedom of expression.

    The aim of the PPF is to establish an effective network of media and journalists throughout Pakistan to gather and document information concerning violations against the press so that they may be able to monitor and defend freedom of expression.

    PPF help to raise the standard of journalism in Pakistan and to promote and defend freedom of expression in Pakistan and internationally through the media, greater awareness of social and development issues and to encourage research on mass communication in Pakistan.

  • Tanzania Media Foundation | TMF

    Tanzania Media Foundation (TMF) stands for an independent, quality, diverse and vibrant media in Tanzania by enabling investigative and public interest journalism and facilitating critical reflection and learning. Their vision is of a strong and independent media sector promoting accountability

    Through our funding and learning activities, they seek to support quality journalism that better informs the public, contributes to debate and thereby increases public demand for greater accountability across Tanzania. They focus on investigative journalism and public interest journalism.

OTHER ORGANISATIONS & INITIATIVES

  • Freedom of Information Advocates Network | FOIAnet

    The Freedom of Information Advocates Network (FOIAnet) is an international information-sharing network of organizations and individuals working to promote the right of access to information.

    FOIAnet runs a discussion list for news and debate on the right of access to information; there are currently over 815 individuals on this list, including civil society representatives, lawyers, academics, information commissioners and others with a specialised interest in the right to information. The network launched and promotes International Right to Know Day which takes place on 28th September of every year.

    Access to information is crucial for individuals and groups to make informed choices, hold their governments to account and interact with their environment. It is also a key enabler in the context of people’s access to development initiatives. Without access to information, individuals are not aware of services and programmes being provided and cannot participate in their development and implementation.

    Two significant developments in 2015 put people at the heart of development. First, the United Nations adopted the Sustainable Development Goals with a target for achievement by 2030 that recognise citizens’ access to information under Goal 16 target 10. Second, in November 2015 UNESCO adopted Res. 38 C/70 declaring 28 September to be International Day for Universal Access to Information (IDUAI) and recommending that the UN General Assembly do the same.

  • IFEX

    The IFEX network of organisations is connected by a shared commitment to defend and promote freedom of expression as a fundamental human right.

    Their members bring their individual strengths to free expression issues and are able to collaborate in the common goal of defending and promoting free expression. It brings together range of international and local free expression groups, enhancing international understanding of the issues and creating opportunities for advocacy work.

    IFEX defends and promotes everyone’s right to free expression. The network advocates for the free expression rights of all, including media workers, citizen journalists, activists, artists, scholars.

  • Global Alliance for Reporting Progress on Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies | SDG16 Global Alliance

    The Global Alliance for Reporting Progress on Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies is a multi-stakeholder initiative and institutional innovation within the international system: it is a coordinating platform for Member States, private sector and civil society organisations (CSOs) to work together for peace, justice, and strong institutions. The Alliance is operated by 7 member states, 3 CSOs, and 3 businesses. Its work is supported by a Secretariat co-facilitated by UNDP, UNODC, UNESCO, UNHCR, OHCHR, a UN Advisory Group composed of 10 UN Agencies, and a large and growing number of partners from other governments, CSOs and businesses around the world.

  • Transparency, Accountability & Participation Network | TAP Network

    The Transparency, Accountability & Participation (TAP) Network is a broad network of CSOs that works to ensure that open, inclusive, accountable, effective governance and peaceful societies are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and that civil society are recognized and mobilized as indispensable partners in the design, implementation of and accountability for sustainable development policies, at all levels.

    The TAP Network engages some of the foremost expert organizations on the issues around Goal 16 of the Sustainable Development Goals to “promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.”

  • United Nations Development Programme | UNDP

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development features for the first time a universally agreed goal for achieving peaceful, just and inclusive societies: Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16. UNDP sees Goal 16 not only as an enabler for achieving all the 17 SDGs, but also as a Goal that is worthwhile achieving in itself. Through their work, they support the peaceful resolution of conflicts, promote the rule of law and access to justice, citizen security and human rights. They assist governments in strengthening their public institutions, help countries reduce corruption and support inclusive participation to ensure that no one is left behind.

  • UNESCO

    UNESCO’s approach to media development is both knowledge-driven and context-sensitive, and it takes into account the challenges and opportunities created by the rapidly changing media environment. IPDC’s Special Initiative on Knowledge-Driven Media Development highlights the importance of generating and sharing of knowledge to advance media development, and has special relevance to an inclusive approach to strengthening journalism education worldwide. This initiative contributes to Goal 16.

    Highlighting the importance of freedom of expression is an indispensable element for flourishing democracies and for fostering citizen participation in the post-2015 development agenda. The rule of law is a prerequisite for, as well as an outcome of, governance and a sustainable and human rights-centred development agenda, and freedom of expression and the safety of journalists are prominent issues for the rule of law. UNESCO’s work in this area contributes to Goal 16 promoting peaceful and inclusive societies, ensuring public access to information and protecting fundamental freedoms.

  • The UN High-Level Political Forum | HLPF

    The meeting of the high-level political forum on sustainable development in 2019 convened under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council, will be held from Tuesday, 9 July, to Thursday, 18 July 2019; including the three-day ministerial meeting of the forum from Tuesday, 16 July, to Thursday, 18 July 2019.

    The theme will be “Empowering people and ensuring inclusiveness and equality“. The Goal 16 “Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels” will be reviewed in depth.

    In accordance with paragraph 84. of the 2030 Agenda, Member States have decided that the HLPF shall carry out regular voluntary reviews of the 2030 Agenda which will include developed and developing countries as well as relevant UN entities and other stakeholders. The reviews are state-led, involving ministerial and other relevant high-level participants, and provide a platform for partnerships, including through the participation of major groups and other relevant stakeholders.

    In 2019, 51 countries (10 for the second time) have volunteered to present their national voluntary reviews to the HLPF.

UPDATES
RESOURCES

CONTENT-RELATED RESOURCES

  • Annual SDG16 Data Initiative Global Report

    The SDG16 Data Initiative Global Report series aims to evaluate global progress towards realizing the 2030 Agenda’s promise of peaceful, just and inclusive societies. The Global Report provides governments, UN officials, and civil society stakeholders with a resource to help understand progress on SDG16 targets and an evidence base for them to identify gaps and shortcomings in both implementing and monitoring SDG16.

    The 2019 Global Report covers all twelve targets, creating the critical baseline of available data necessary for future substantive analysis. The 2019 Global Report, prepared in light of SDG16’s initial review at the 2019 High-Level Political Forum (HLPF), assess progress made on all twelve targets. Through this review, the 2019 Global Report aims to provide policymakers and civil society actors with pathways forward to improve both SDG16 implementation and data coverage.

  • Article 19 Your right to know: A game to navigate the right to information

    Making information requests can be a tricky game of two steps forward, one steps backwards, everywhere in the world. The right to information gives every person the right to obtain information, documents and data from public bodies and others, without having to give reason. International law has provided States with standards for laws, what are the exemptions and how to appeal in case a request get rejected.  Over 120 countries around the world have adopted comprehensive right to information laws or national policies. This means that 90% of the world’s population lives in a country with a RTI law or policy.

    “Your Right to Know” is a game to help civil society, journalists, activists and others learn to use RTI laws to guarantee their rights, gain knowledge and challenge governments and institutions on key issues.

  • Connections between the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda: The case for policy coherence

    This working paper from the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) is similar to GFMD’s own Media Sustainability Barometer (MSB) in that it draws on the interconnections between the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including SDG 16. This infographic also visualises the interconnection.

  • Empowering Civil Society for National Reporting and Action on SDG16+ Report

    This Empowering Civil Society for National Reporting and Action on SDG16” report (Empowering Civil Society report) — published in partnership by the Transparency, Accountability, and Participation (TAP) Network, Asia Development Alliance (ADA), and Forus, with contributions from CIVICUSCivil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (CSPPS)Global Forum for Media Development (GFMD)Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC)NamatiSaferworld, and Transparency International (TI)—features a compilation of national civil society case studies and civil society spotlight reports on SDG16.

    It provides analysis of a range of approaches and methodologies utilized by civil society for implementation and monitoring of SDG16 by civil society, specifically with regards to drafting and disseminating of spotlight reports. The report also examines gaps, challenges, and opportunities for robust accountability at all levels, and provides key recommendations for enhancing civil society monitoring and action going forward.

  • Enabling the implementation of the 2030 Agenda through SDG16+: Anchoring peace, justice and inclusion

    The report, launched by the Global AllianceEnabling the implementation of the 2030 Agenda through SDG16+: Anchoring peace, justice and inclusion provides an overview of country level actions and progress on SDG 16+ across different regions and development contexts and highlights key trends and findings on SDG 16+ implementation globally.

    The report has been informed by a series of regional multi-stakeholder consultations on SDG 16+, 25 country case studies and draws from evidence of recent research and analysis across SDG 16+ targets.

  • FOIAnet Resources for Right to Information Advocates

    FOIAnet Resources for Right to Information Advocates includes publications, model laws, training materials for the public or public officials, useful links, organisations and other resources related to the right of access to information.

    • SDG 16.10.2 – Measuring RTI implementation – FOIAnet Methodology – Based on the central methodological framework developed in the UNESCO metadata for SDG 16, and given the importance of independent civil society input into the assessment of the achievement of the SDGs, FOIAnet took the initiative to develop a concrete methodology that would guide its members to capture data on SDG 16.10.2 and provide a baseline for following years.
  • GFMD Members' Resources

    • Access to Information and the Sustainable Development Goals Report from Article 19 reviews the current state of the right of access to information across the world to provide a baseline for future assessments over the lifetime of the 2030 Agenda. It finds that there has been significant incorporation of the right in well over half of UN Member States. The right has now been adopted into law or policy in 118 countries around the world (61 percent of UN Member States) from the largest countries (China, India, USA, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Mexico) to some of the smallest (St Vincent and the Grenadines, Vanuatu) covering 89 percent of the world’s population. In addition, 90 countries have adopted explicit constitutional guarantees. Many countries are also implementing transparency initiatives such as e-government or open data which supplement the right but generally do not fully ensure the right of access to all information.
    • Article 19 Infographic: Progress on the right to information around the world
    • The role of the media since the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals by Zoé Titus, Strategic Coordinator of the Namibia Media Trust
    • MDIF’s literature review on Media development’s role in social, economic, and political progress.
  • GFMD SDG16.10 Pilot Projects

    GFMD has launched three pilot projects in collaboration with civil society and media actors in Serbia, Pakistan, and Tanzania aiming to produce shadow reports related to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16.10, which targets public access to information.

    These reports should assist our partners in conducting an assessment of the 16.10.2 indicator “number of countries that adopt and implement constitutional, statutory and/or policy guarantees for public access to information. Moreover, it should encourage governments to complete a review of SDG 16.10 through the Voluntary National Review (VNR) framework.

    In July 2019, under the auspices of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the annual meeting of the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) will enable countries to share progress on the achievement of the SDGs and reveal the outcome of VNRs. It will be an opportunity for partners to present and to disseminate their report related to public access to information around the HLPF as well, notably by holding a side-event.

    The SDG 16.10 project is funded by the German Development and Cooperation Ministry and by Deutsche Welle Akademie. Free Press Unlimited and UNESCO are also engaged in leading a SDG 16.10 shadow report.

  • Goal 16 Advocacy Toolkit

    Recognizing the critical importance of Goal 16 of the 2030 Agenda on peaceful, just and inclusive societies and accountable institutions, the toolkit, established by TAP Network, provides civil society and other nongovernmental stakeholders with guidance on how to engage with their governments and other local, regional or international stakeholders to support the planning, implementation, follow-up and accountability of Goal 16.

  • IFEX's explainer on SDGs: What role for freedom of expression?

    Your State has committed to “ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms”. This is what the Sustainable Development Goal 16.10 affirms. Is your government holding up to its commitment? You can help to monitor its progress – and contribute to it! Check out this 5-minute guide to learn how.

  • Measuring SDG 16.10.2: A Synthesis Report from Centre for Law & Democracy on the FOIAnet

    In 2017, the Freedom of Information Advocates Network (FOIAnet) developed a methodology for parallel civil society reporting on State compliance with Sustainable Development Goal Indicator 16.10.2, which assesses the number of countries that have adopted and implemented access to information guarantees. The Centre for Law and Democracy developed this synthesis report of the FOIAnet methodology as applied by civil society groups in five countries.

  • Media4Democracy resources

    Media4Democracy is an EU-funded Technical Assistance Facility strengthening the European Union Delegations’ ability to implement the EU Human Rights Guidelines on Freedom of Expression Online and Offline. As part of its direct service to the EU Delegations, Media4Democracy provides materials and tools for advocacy, capacity building and to enhance knowledge of a wide range of issues linked to freedom of expression and implementing the EU Guidelines on Freedom of Expression. Some of their resources include:

    • M4D and EUDs Pilot Packages of Technical Assistance Enhancing Support for Freedom of Expression (link)
    • Supporting Access to Information: A Practical Guide for EU Delegations (report)
    • Tools and Resources (link)
  • New America and OECD's SDGs in Order

    SDGs in Order, developed by New America and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), is the first-ever sequence for tackling the most important problems in the world. It ranks the SDG targets based on a survey of 85 developmental economists, political scientists, and social scientists around the world, which asked them to put a cleaned-up list of 117 targets in the right order based on their ability to catalyse and realise the 2030 Agenda. More information is also available here.

  • Practical guidance for civil society reporting on SDG16+

    Since 2015, Saferworld has worked with civil society and governments to translate the 2030 Agenda commitments to peaceful, just and inclusive societies into action.

    For the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be achieved, governments and other stakeholders must be accountable for the commitments agreed in 2015. Reporting by civil society on national progress towards the SDGs is critical for ensuring accountability, and provides an important complement to official accounts of progress.

    This briefing provides practical guidance for civil society organisations to develop independent reports on progress towards the goal of peaceful, just and inclusive societies, referred to as SDG16+. The guidance is in two parts: the first outlines a series of steps for developing a report, and the second proposes a structure for the report’s content.

  • Putting SDG16+ into practice

    Saferworld has worked to support the national adaption of the commitments found in SDG16+ of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies.

    This infographic illustrates how this ‘localisation’ approach works in 11 important steps

  • Rome Civil Society Declaration on SDG16+

    The Rome Declaration is the product of an online consultation promoted amongst the TAP Membership and other civil society networks, as well as deliberations during the Rome Conference Civil Society Day on 26 May 2019, just prior to the Rome SDG16 Conference. The extensive process to draft this resolution was guided by three co-facilitators, including Coco Lammers from Namati, Peter van Sluijs from the Civil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding, and Pascal Richard from the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict.

    The Rome Declaration was adopted and presented by civil society in a statement to Members States, international organizations, and other SDG16+ stakeholders at the Rome SDG16+ Conference on 28 May 2016.

  • SDG Accountability Handbook launched by TAP Network

    The TAP Network introduces the SDG Accountability Handbook: A Practical Guide for Civil Society.

    The SDG Accountability Handbook is a capacity development resource that seeks to support national-level civil society hold their government accountable for 2030 Agenda promises, better understand specific approaches to hold governments accountable for the SDGs, and guide them through the practical steps they can take to improve accountability for the 2030 Agenda in their country.

    It features a variety of distinct approaches civil society can use to monitor and follow-up on SDG implementation, as well as country-specific case studies and key resources and tips.

  • SDG Indicators Metadata repository

    SDG Indicators metadata repository reflects the latest reference metadata information provided by the UN System and other international organisations on data and statistics for the Tier I and II indicators in the global indicator framework. Since Tier III indicators are still under methodological development, a link to the webpage that includes all available work plans is being provided. This repository will be further updated and periodically reviewed in cooperation with the respective data compilers.

  • SDG Resource Centre and Knowledge Hub

    In addition to the main Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) resource centre maintained by the United Nations, the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) also launched the SDG Knowledge Hub to provide an online resource center for news and commentary regarding the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including all 17 SDGs.

  • Shadow report: SDG16 implementation in Latin America

    Together with seven national chapters (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras and Peru) Transparency International prepared independent reports that allow for a different vision from that of the national governments regarding what the challenges are that we must take on in order to achieve the targets that SDG 16 proposes.

    The report focuses mainly on the anti-corruption agenda, specifically targets 16.4 (illicit financial and arms flows), 16.5 (reduce bribery and other forms of corruption) and 16.10 (access to information). This research is based on 175 indicators explicitly developed as part of the global Transparency International project.

    The results can be seen in this report and are owed to the effort of the civil society organizations that have assumed responsibility for the success of the 2030 Agenda. They recognize that this shared responsibility applies to all social actors and that their actions, coordination and synergies can contribute to the success of the targets that we have set, as a society, for the world of tomorrow that we seek to build.

  • Stakeholders Invited to Provide Inputs on SDG16

    An online consultation launched on the UN’s SDG Knowledge Platform seeks to gather inputs from Major Groups and other stakeholders on the SDGs that will be reviewed in depth at the July 2019 session of the UN High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF). A new channel for stakeholder input, the consultation will result in a summary highlighting the main points raised by participants, and for dissemination by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA).

    According to the E-consultation webpage, the consultation, which runs through 8 February 2019, will serve to improve stakeholders’ access to information and promote broad and participatory engagement on the follow-up and review related to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It notes that “concise and straightforward inputs” should be submitted online for a limited number of questions that are proposed for each SDG under review in 2019, notably SDG 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions).

  • State of Access of Information in Africa

    In celebration of International Right to Information Day, the African Platform on Access to Information (APAI) Campaign and fesmedia Africa released a research study on the state of access to information in Africa. Reviewing fourteen countries, and using the expertise and experience of the APAI Working Group Members, the research provides a useful snapshot of the state of access to information on the continent while providing clear and simple summaries and infographics, measured against the APAI Declaration of Principles.
  • Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform

    UN’s Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) serves Member States, Major Groups and other stakeholders, as well as the general public, by providing wide access to information and knowledge for sustainable development, through its online Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform and social media outlets.

    The Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) seeks to provide leadership and catalyse action in promoting and coordinating implementation of internationally agreed development goals, including the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Among other mandates, it hosts the secretariat for the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), the central platform within the United Nations system for the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by Heads of State and Governments in September 2015. The 2030 Agenda is a new plan of action for people, planet and prosperity, with 17 SDGs and 169 associated targets at its core.

    The work of the Division translates into six core functions: (1) Support to UN intergovernmental processes on sustainable development; (2) Analysis and policy development; (3) Capacity development at the request of Member States; (4) Inter-agency coordination; and (5) stakeholder engagement, partnerships, communication and outreach; and (6) Knowledge management.

    • The UN System SDGs action online database is the UN family’s repository of actions, initiatives and plans on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs). It contains information made available by UN system entities. It is searchable and is regularly updated. It serves as a useful reference tool for learning about what UN system entities have been doing in support of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs).
    • The High-level Political Forum, United Nations central platform for follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals, provides for the full and effective participation of all States Members of the United Nations and States members of specialized agencies. The Forum meets annually under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council for eight days, including a three-day ministerial segment and every four years at the level of Heads of State and Government under the auspices of the General Assembly for two days.
    • Sustainable Development Goal 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. Goal 16 will be reviewed in-depth at the high-level political forum in 2019.
    • Handbook for the Preparation of Voluntary National Reviews is a handbook for country preparation and presentation of voluntary national reviews (VNRs). It should be read in conjunction with the updated Secretary-General’s proposal for voluntary common reporting guidelines for voluntary national reviews at the High-level Political Forum on sustainable development (HLPF).
  • Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN)

    Launched by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in August 2012, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) mobilizes scientific and technical expertise from academia, civil society, and the private sector in support of sustainable development problem solving at local, national, and global scales. It aims to accelerate joint learning and help to overcome the compartmentalization of technical and policy work by promoting integrated approaches to the interconnected economic, social, and environmental challenges confronting the world.

  • Strengthening the United Nations' Role in Media Development

    The United Nations made a promise in Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human to promote free and independent media around the world. Citizens cannot “seek, receive and impart information and ideas, through any medium, regardless of frontiers” without access to a vibrant media sphere, including a free and open internet.

    But how does the UN interpret and act upon this obligation? How is that changing? And how can the UN help create a more effective response to the profound challenges confronting independent media?

    The report “Strengthening the United Nations’ Role in Media Development” examines the myriad ways that the agencies and bodies of the United Nations support the development of healthy media systems. Author Bill Orme highlights the role of four UN organizations in particular—UNESCO, UNDP, UNICEF, and DPO—and makes recommendations targeted to these agencies, as well as to UN member states and donors.

  • The SDG 16 Data Initiative

    The SDG16 Data Initiative is a collective project to compile existing global data that can help track progress towards the achievement of SDG16. The recommended UN official indicators along with proposed complementary indicators are listed for each target. We have included a variety of respected data providers and sought to highlight gaps and useful alternative data sources in SDG16 target areas.

    • SDG Data Initiative Global Report aims to evaluate global progress towards realizing the 2030 Agenda’s promise of peaceful, just and inclusive societies. The Global Report provides governments, UN officials, and civil society stakeholders with a resource to help understand progress on SDG16 targets and an evidence base for them to identify gaps and shortcomings in both implementing and monitoring SDG16.
  • The SDG 16 Hub

    The SDG 16 Hub was initiated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in response to an increasing demand for structured and centralised information on SDG 16 and the desire for meaningful and impactful collaboration opportunities.

    The SDG 16 Hub is not a corporate website, but a hub designed to allow all stakeholders with an interest in SDG 16 to learn about the key pillars related to SDG 16, share knowledge, and collaborate. It includes resources on SDG16 that are produced by UN agencies, governments, other stakeholders as well as multi-stakeholder initiatives.

    What does the SDG 16 Hub do?

    The SDG 16 Hub is designed to be a one-stop shop for knowledge and collaboration on SDG 16. It does so by offering the following:

    • KNOWLEDGE: A growing collection of resources on SDG 16 in a searchable database. In addition, users can browse resources by following three key questions: WHAT, WHO, HOW TO.
    • COLLABORATION: The SDG 16 Hub also hosts an interactive space to foster sharing and learning on SDG 16. Sign up today to collaborate with colleagues and partners!
  • Time to invest: how to support action on SDG16+

    Four years into the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 16+ (SDG16+), the picture is not encouraging. Efforts to mobilise action and generate investments for SDG16+ have fallen short and, unless something changes, will fail to achieve the global commitment to building more peaceful, just and inclusive societies by 2030.

    But as Saferworld shows in its latest briefing, with a coherent approach and focused action there is still time to turn the situation around. Although many of the issues that fall under SDG16+ are complex and politically sensitive, there are a number of lessons and successes that will help practitioners better understand how to effectively support action on SDG16+.

    This briefing focuses on:

    • the different ways that donors and policymakers can support action on SDG16+
    • a review of where and how support has been provided so far
    • the need for a more balanced and concerted approach to supporting action on SDG16+
    • how to enable action on SDG16+ at the national and sub-national level
  • Tracking progress on Sustainable Development Goal 16 with Global State of Democracy Indices

    This GSoD In Focus provides an overview of the progress in implementing Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16 in the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, by using the Global State of Democracy (GSoD) Indices as complementary data to the official indicators. It does so based on the assumption that democracy has an instrumental value, as an enabler of sustainable development (International IDEA 2018: 5–9).

    Although the GSoD Indices pertain to a total of nine SDGs (International IDEA 2019b), this GSoD In Focus zooms in on the progress on SDG 16 (Peace, justice and accountable institutions) at the global, regional and country levels. The data presented contributes to the current debate on inclusion, equal treatment and participation, which coincides with this year’s theme of the UN International Democracy Day, as advocated by the UN Secretary-General, António Guterres. This GSoD In Focus is published on 15 September as a contribution by International IDEA to marking this day.

  • UNDP’s Engagement with the Media for Governance, Sustainable Development and Peace

    The past few decades have seen a global revolution in the ways in which people access, consume and share information. New challenges and opportunities brought about by these transformations now intersect with longer-standing challenges to media pluralism, freedom and independence. Featuring 13 new country case studies, this report highlights the diverse scope, successes and lessons of UNDP’s recent engagement with the media for promoting inclusive governance, sustainable development and peace.

  • UNESCO's Approach to SDGs

    UNESCO’s work contributes to Goal 16 of promoting peaceful and inclusive societies, ensuring public access to information and protecting fundamental freedoms. UNESCO’s approach to media development is both knowledge-driven and context-sensitive, and it takes into account the challenges and opportunities created by the rapidly changing media environment. IPDC’s Special Initiative on Knowledge-Driven Media Development highlights the importance of generating and sharing of knowledge to advance media development, and has special relevance to an inclusive approach to strengthening journalism education worldwide. This initiative contributes to Goal 16. We also encourage you to review UNESCO’s Media Development Indicators (MDIs), which includes multiple resources related to access to information and other SDG 16-related measures.

ACTORS

GFMD MEMBERS & PARTNERS

  • ARTICLE 19

    Article 19 focuses on resources such as the right to information (RTI).

    RTI enables the public and civil society to access information held by public bodies, and empowers them to hold their leaders accountable, develop a fuller understanding of the world, and ensure other human rights. The right to information is an important tool for holding governments to account, as it requires them to be more transparent in their activities, for example in the way they spend public finances.  This not only helps fight corruption, but it helps build stable and resilient democracies, where the powerful are genuinely accountable. The protection of whistleblowers to be able to reveal information of public interest is also crucially important.

    Over the past 15 years, global progress on access to information, both in law and practice, has been significant. Nearly 120 countries around the world have adopted comprehensive RTI laws, encompassing nearly 90 percent of the world’s population. These laws have been extensively used to enable people to achieve their social and economic, as well as their human rights. However, there remains a long way to go to instill genuine transparency and protect the right to information for all.

  • Balkan Investigative Reporting Network | BIRN

    Key issues in the Balkans that BIRN has identified include lack of freedom of expression, loss of media independence, lack of good governance, an absence of anti-corruption efforts, poor access to justice and rights and civil society organisations’ inability to address issues of public interest.

    To address those issues, the Network implements a range of programmes and projects focused on training journalists, publishing and broadcasting; monitoring, advocating and debating; working with CSOs as well as creating public archives and databases.

    BIRN targets a wide range of stakeholders, from the general public, journalists and media in general, to decision makers, both national and international, and civil society organisations.

  • Center for Law and Democracy | CLD

    The Centre for Law and Democracy believes in a world in which robust respect for all human rights underpins strong participatory democracy at all levels of governance – local, national, regional and international – leading to social justice and equality.

    The Centre for Law and Democracy works to promote, protect and develop those human rights which serve as the foundation for or underpin democracy, including the rights to freedom of expression, to vote and participate in governance, to access information and to freedom of assembly and association.

  • Deustche Welle Akademie | DW-A

    DWA believes that independent media and responsible journalism are essential worldwide. Given Germany’s history, they believe that people should be able to freely express their views and have access to independent sources of information. DWA considers this to be an important prerequisite for peace and democracy.

    They support the development of independent, transparent media systems, quality journalism and media expertise. They help rebuild media in post-crisis and post-conflict environments and contribute internationally to the professional training of media workers.

  • Free Press Unlimited | FPU

    Free Press Unlimited believes that objective information can be of life-and-death importance. Free Press Unlimited helps local journalists in war zones and conflict areas to provide their audience with trustworthy news and information. The information that people need to survive and give shape to their own future.

  • Pakistan Press Foundation | PPF

    Pakistan Press Foundation (PPF) is an independent media documentation and training centre, non-governmental organisation committed to promoting and defending freedom of expression.

    The aim of the PPF is to establish an effective network of media and journalists throughout Pakistan to gather and document information concerning violations against the press so that they may be able to monitor and defend freedom of expression.

    PPF help to raise the standard of journalism in Pakistan and to promote and defend freedom of expression in Pakistan and internationally through the media, greater awareness of social and development issues and to encourage research on mass communication in Pakistan.

  • Tanzania Media Foundation | TMF

    Tanzania Media Foundation (TMF) stands for an independent, quality, diverse and vibrant media in Tanzania by enabling investigative and public interest journalism and facilitating critical reflection and learning. Their vision is of a strong and independent media sector promoting accountability

    Through our funding and learning activities, they seek to support quality journalism that better informs the public, contributes to debate and thereby increases public demand for greater accountability across Tanzania. They focus on investigative journalism and public interest journalism.

OTHER ORGANISATIONS & INITIATIVES

  • Freedom of Information Advocates Network | FOIAnet

    The Freedom of Information Advocates Network (FOIAnet) is an international information-sharing network of organizations and individuals working to promote the right of access to information.

    FOIAnet runs a discussion list for news and debate on the right of access to information; there are currently over 815 individuals on this list, including civil society representatives, lawyers, academics, information commissioners and others with a specialised interest in the right to information. The network launched and promotes International Right to Know Day which takes place on 28th September of every year.

    Access to information is crucial for individuals and groups to make informed choices, hold their governments to account and interact with their environment. It is also a key enabler in the context of people’s access to development initiatives. Without access to information, individuals are not aware of services and programmes being provided and cannot participate in their development and implementation.

    Two significant developments in 2015 put people at the heart of development. First, the United Nations adopted the Sustainable Development Goals with a target for achievement by 2030 that recognise citizens’ access to information under Goal 16 target 10. Second, in November 2015 UNESCO adopted Res. 38 C/70 declaring 28 September to be International Day for Universal Access to Information (IDUAI) and recommending that the UN General Assembly do the same.

  • IFEX

    The IFEX network of organisations is connected by a shared commitment to defend and promote freedom of expression as a fundamental human right.

    Their members bring their individual strengths to free expression issues and are able to collaborate in the common goal of defending and promoting free expression. It brings together range of international and local free expression groups, enhancing international understanding of the issues and creating opportunities for advocacy work.

    IFEX defends and promotes everyone’s right to free expression. The network advocates for the free expression rights of all, including media workers, citizen journalists, activists, artists, scholars.

  • Global Alliance for Reporting Progress on Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies | SDG16 Global Alliance

    The Global Alliance for Reporting Progress on Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies is a multi-stakeholder initiative and institutional innovation within the international system: it is a coordinating platform for Member States, private sector and civil society organisations (CSOs) to work together for peace, justice, and strong institutions. The Alliance is operated by 7 member states, 3 CSOs, and 3 businesses. Its work is supported by a Secretariat co-facilitated by UNDP, UNODC, UNESCO, UNHCR, OHCHR, a UN Advisory Group composed of 10 UN Agencies, and a large and growing number of partners from other governments, CSOs and businesses around the world.

  • Transparency, Accountability & Participation Network | TAP Network

    The Transparency, Accountability & Participation (TAP) Network is a broad network of CSOs that works to ensure that open, inclusive, accountable, effective governance and peaceful societies are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and that civil society are recognized and mobilized as indispensable partners in the design, implementation of and accountability for sustainable development policies, at all levels.

    The TAP Network engages some of the foremost expert organizations on the issues around Goal 16 of the Sustainable Development Goals to “promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.”

  • United Nations Development Programme | UNDP

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development features for the first time a universally agreed goal for achieving peaceful, just and inclusive societies: Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16. UNDP sees Goal 16 not only as an enabler for achieving all the 17 SDGs, but also as a Goal that is worthwhile achieving in itself. Through their work, they support the peaceful resolution of conflicts, promote the rule of law and access to justice, citizen security and human rights. They assist governments in strengthening their public institutions, help countries reduce corruption and support inclusive participation to ensure that no one is left behind.

  • UNESCO

    UNESCO’s approach to media development is both knowledge-driven and context-sensitive, and it takes into account the challenges and opportunities created by the rapidly changing media environment. IPDC’s Special Initiative on Knowledge-Driven Media Development highlights the importance of generating and sharing of knowledge to advance media development, and has special relevance to an inclusive approach to strengthening journalism education worldwide. This initiative contributes to Goal 16.

    Highlighting the importance of freedom of expression is an indispensable element for flourishing democracies and for fostering citizen participation in the post-2015 development agenda. The rule of law is a prerequisite for, as well as an outcome of, governance and a sustainable and human rights-centred development agenda, and freedom of expression and the safety of journalists are prominent issues for the rule of law. UNESCO’s work in this area contributes to Goal 16 promoting peaceful and inclusive societies, ensuring public access to information and protecting fundamental freedoms.

  • The UN High-Level Political Forum | HLPF

    The meeting of the high-level political forum on sustainable development in 2019 convened under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council, will be held from Tuesday, 9 July, to Thursday, 18 July 2019; including the three-day ministerial meeting of the forum from Tuesday, 16 July, to Thursday, 18 July 2019.

    The theme will be “Empowering people and ensuring inclusiveness and equality“. The Goal 16 “Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels” will be reviewed in depth.

    In accordance with paragraph 84. of the 2030 Agenda, Member States have decided that the HLPF shall carry out regular voluntary reviews of the 2030 Agenda which will include developed and developing countries as well as relevant UN entities and other stakeholders. The reviews are state-led, involving ministerial and other relevant high-level participants, and provide a platform for partnerships, including through the participation of major groups and other relevant stakeholders.

    In 2019, 51 countries (10 for the second time) have volunteered to present their national voluntary reviews to the HLPF.