• Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform

    UN’s Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) serves Member States, Major Groups and other stakeholders, as well as the general public, by providing wide access to information and knowledge for sustainable development, through its online Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform and social media outlets.

    The Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) seeks to provide leadership and catalyse action in promoting and coordinating implementation of internationally agreed development goals, including the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Among other mandates, it hosts the secretariat for the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), the central platform within the United Nations system for the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by Heads of State and Governments in September 2015. The 2030 Agenda is a new plan of action for people, planet and prosperity, with 17 SDGs and 169 associated targets at its core.

    The work of the Division translates into six core functions: (1) Support to UN intergovernmental processes on sustainable development; (2) Analysis and policy development; (3) Capacity development at the request of Member States; (4) Inter-agency coordination; and (5) stakeholder engagement, partnerships, communication and outreach; and (6) Knowledge management.

    • The UN System SDGs action online database is the UN family’s repository of actions, initiatives and plans on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs). It contains information made available by UN system entities. It is searchable and is regularly updated. It serves as a useful reference tool for learning about what UN system entities have been doing in support of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs).
    • The High-level Political Forum, United Nations central platform for follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals, provides for the full and effective participation of all States Members of the United Nations and States members of specialized agencies. The Forum meets annually under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council for eight days, including a three-day ministerial segment and every four years at the level of Heads of State and Government under the auspices of the General Assembly for two days.
    • Sustainable Development Goal 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. Goal 16 will be reviewed in-depth at the high-level political forum in 2019.
    • Handbook for the Preparation of Voluntary National Reviews is a handbook for country preparation and presentation of voluntary national reviews (VNRs). It should be read in conjunction with the updated Secretary-General’s proposal for voluntary common reporting guidelines for voluntary national reviews at the High-level Political Forum on sustainable development (HLPF).
  • Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN)

    Launched by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in August 2012, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) mobilizes scientific and technical expertise from academia, civil society, and the private sector in support of sustainable development problem solving at local, national, and global scales. It aims to accelerate joint learning and help to overcome the compartmentalization of technical and policy work by promoting integrated approaches to the interconnected economic, social, and environmental challenges confronting the world.

  • UNESCO's Approach to SDGs

    UNESCO’s work contributes to Goal 16 of promoting peaceful and inclusive societies, ensuring public access to information and protecting fundamental freedoms. UNESCO’s approach to media development is both knowledge-driven and context-sensitive, and it takes into account the challenges and opportunities created by the rapidly changing media environment. IPDC’s Special Initiative on Knowledge-Driven Media Development highlights the importance of generating and sharing of knowledge to advance media development, and has special relevance to an inclusive approach to strengthening journalism education worldwide. This initiative contributes to Goal 16.

  • SDG Indicators Metadata repository

    SDG Indicators metadata repository reflects the latest reference metadata information provided by the UN System and other international organisations on data and statistics for the Tier I and II indicators in the global indicator framework. Since Tier III indicators are still under methodological development, a link to the webpage that includes all available work plans is being provided. This repository will be further updated and periodically reviewed in cooperation with the respective data compilers.

  • The SDG 16 Hub

    The SDG 16 Hub was initiated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in response to an increasing demand for structured and centralised information on SDG 16 and the desire for meaningful and impactful collaboration opportunities.

    The SDG 16 Hub is not a corporate website, but a hub designed to allow all stakeholders with an interest in SDG 16 to learn about the key pillars related to SDG 16, share knowledge, and collaborate. It includes resources on SDG16 that are produced by UN agencies, governments, other stakeholders as well as multi-stakeholder initiatives.

    What does the SDG 16 Hub do?

    The SDG 16 Hub is designed to be a one-stop shop for knowledge and collaboration on SDG 16. It does so by offering the following:

    • KNOWLEDGE: A growing collection of resources on SDG 16 in a searchable database. In addition, users can browse resources by following three key questions: WHAT, WHO, HOW TO.
    • COLLABORATION: The SDG 16 Hub also hosts an interactive space to foster sharing and learning on SDG 16. Sign up today to collaborate with colleagues and partners!
  • The SDG 16 Data Initiative

    The SDG16 Data Initiative is a collective project to compile existing global data that can help track progress towards the achievement of SDG16. The recommended UN official indicators along with proposed complementary indicators are listed for each target. We have included a variety of respected data providers and sought to highlight gaps and useful alternative data sources in SDG16 target areas.

    • SDG Data Initiative Global Report aims to evaluate global progress towards realizing the 2030 Agenda’s promise of peaceful, just and inclusive societies. The Global Report provides governments, UN officials, and civil society stakeholders with a resource to help understand progress on SDG16 targets and an evidence base for them to identify gaps and shortcomings in both implementing and monitoring SDG16.
  • FOIAnet Resources for Right to Information Advocates

    FOIAnet Resources for Right to Information Advocates includes publications, model laws, training materials for the public or public officials, useful links, organisations and other resources related to the right of access to information.

    • SDG 16.10.2 – Measuring RTI implementation – FOIAnet Methodology – Based on the central methodological framework developed in the UNESCO metadata for SDG 16, and given the importance of independent civil society input into the assessment of the achievement of the SDGs, FOIAnet took the initiative to develop a concrete methodology that would guide its members to capture data on SDG 16.10.2 and provide a baseline for following years.
  • State of Access of Information in Africa

    In celebration of International Right to Information Day, the African Platform on Access to Information (APAI) Campaign and fesmedia Africa released a research study on the state of access to information in Africa. Reviewing fourteen countries, and using the expertise and experience of the APAI Working Group Members, the research provides a useful snapshot of the state of access to information on the continent while providing clear and simple summaries and infographics, measured against the APAI Declaration of Principles.
  • GFMD Member's Resources

    • Access to Information and the Sustainable Development Goals Report from Article 19 reviews the current state of the right of access to information across the world to provide a baseline for future assessments over the lifetime of the 2030 Agenda. It finds that there has been significant incorporation of the right in well over half of UN Member States. The right has now been adopted into law or policy in 118 countries around the world (61 percent of UN Member States) from the largest countries (China, India, USA, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Mexico) to some of the smallest (St Vincent and the Grenadines, Vanuatu) covering 89 percent of the world’s population. In addition, 90 countries have adopted explicit constitutional guarantees. Many countries are also implementing transparency initiatives such as e-government or open data which supplement the right but generally do not fully ensure the right of access to all information.
    • Article 19 Infographic: Progress on the right to information around the world
    • The role of the media since the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals by Zoé Titus, Strategic Coordinator of the Namibia Media Trust
    • MDIF’s literature review on Media development’s role in social, economic, and political progress.

GFMD MEMBERS

  • ARTICLE 19

    The open flow of information has been key to the Internet’s transformative effect in modern society. In order to safeguard its benefits, the right to free expression must be defended when addressing issues of content and defining the technical management of the Internet’s architecture. That’s what ARTICLE 19 focuses on in this space. It is also one of the core members behind the Working Group on Internet Governance that was established at IGF 2017 in Geneva, Switzerland. A featured resource we recommend is:

     

    Some of their other resources include:

     

    They have many more resources as well regarding the following:

  • CIMA

    The Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA) is spearheading multiple initiatives to address how journalists and media organisations can participate more meaningfully in Internet policy-related discussions. They also produce relevant guides, briefs, reports, and other resources that focus on or relate to Internet policies impacting the media, democratisation, and development sectors.It is also one of the core members behind the Working Group on Internet Governance that was established at IGF 2017 in Geneva, Switzerland. Two featured resources we recommend are:

    • Getting Involved in Internet Governance: An Introductory Guide
    • Media Development in the Digital Age: Five Ways to Engage in Internet Governance (in collaboration with ARTICLE 19)
      • Also see the GFMD webinar about this resource

     

    Other examples include:

  • DW Akademie

    Deutsche Welle (DW) Akademie provides multiple Internet governance-related resources on their #MediaDev page. A featured resource we recommend is:

    • Guidebook on Internet Governance: Media Freedom in a Connected World

     

    Others include:

    • Audience Research in Media Development: Overview, Case Studies, and Lessons Learned
    • Dossier: Digital Rights, Privacy, & Security
    • Internet governance: Why you should care
    • Media Freedom Indices in the Media Development Context: How the Different Information Tools Can Be Used
  • Free Press Unlimited

    Free Press Unlimited (FPU) has actively advocated for greater involvement of journalists and the media development community in Internet governance and policy discussions.

  • International Media Support

    International Media Support (IMS) is a Denmark-based NGO that has been significantly increased its involvement within the Internet governance ecosystem, such as within the IGF and ICANN. It is also one of the core members behind the Working Group on Internet Governance that was established at IGF 2017 in Geneva, Switzerland. Relevant resources include:

    • IMS publications
    • The battle for freedom of expression online: Where are the journalists?
  • IREX

    IREX engages in a host of activities, some of which relate to education, media literacy, and Internet freedom. They also publish a Media Sustainability Index (MSI). Other relevant resources include:

OTHER ORGANISATIONS AND INITIATIVES

  • Access Now

    Access Now is an international non-profit, human rights, public policy, and advocacy group dedicated to an open and free Internet. Access Now hosts the RightsCon Summit Series each year, and also initiated the #KeepItOn campaign against Internet shutdowns. They also produce reports and briefings, such as the following resource:

    • Proposals for Regulating Internet Apps and Services: Understanding the Digital Rights Impact of the “over-the-top” (OTT) Debate
  • Association for Progressive Communications

    The Association for Progressive Communications (APC) is an international network of organizations that was founded in 1990 to provide communication infrastructure, including Internet-based applications, to groups and individuals who work for peace, gender equality, human rights, protection of the environment, and sustainability. They have multiple publicationsand other resources relevant to journalists and media development organizations such as:

  • Best Bits

    Best Bits is a civil society network on Internet governance and Internet rights. It offers an open space where each group can present and advocate for the initiatives that they believe offer the best positive agenda for advancing broadly shared civil society interests in Internet governance. Participate by signing up for their mailing list.

  • Council of Europe

    The Council of Europe produces many relevant resources on Internet freedom, freedom of expression, algorithm transparency, and more. They also host specialised working groups, such as:

    • MSI-JOQ – Committee of Experts on Quality Journalism in the Digital Age
      • Draft recommendation on promoting a favourable environment for
        quality journalism in the digital age
      • Draft study on media and information literacy in the digital
        environment
    • MSI-AUT – Committee of Experts on Human Rights Dimensions of Automated Data Processing and Different Forms of Artificial Intelligence
  • Committee to Protect Journalists

    The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) also advocates for Internet freedom.

  • DiploFoundation and GIP Digital Watch

    DiploFoundation is a non-profit foundation established by the governments of Malta and Switzerland. Diplo works to increase the role of small and developing states, and to improve global governance and international policy development. One of its initiatives, the GIP Digital Watch observatory, is a comprehensive Internet governance and digital policy observatory that provides monthly updates about digital policy as well as tracks issues and policy developments. Some of their resources include:

  • FoME

    The Forum for Media & Development (Forum Medien und Entwicklung – FoME) is a network of German institutions and individuals active in the field of media development cooperation. In addition to hosting an annual Symposium, they also feature many relevant resources and publications. You can also join their mailing list.

  • Freedom House

    Freedom House has multiple resources relevant to Internet freedom, including:

  • GigaNET

    The Global Internet Governance Academic Network (GigaNET) is an international association of academic researchers. Members include researchers from a wide range of disciplines and locations who are contributing to research, teaching, and engagement in local, regional, and international debates on Internet governance.

  • Global Partners Digital

    Global Partners Digital (GPD) is a social purpose company working to protect and promote human rights values online, and the governance processes that uphold and further these values. Their two main priorities are to grow the number of civil society groups engaging in the internet policy and governance arena, and to make governments, public authorities, international institutions, and businesses aware of the benefits of internet policies and governance processes that promote and protect human rights. Relevant resources include:

    • A Rights-respecting Model of Online Content Regulation by Platforms
    • Content regulation laws threaten our freedom of expression. We need a new approach
    • Framework for Multistakeholder Cyber Policy Development
    • GPD’s Organisational Development Framework
    • GPD’s response to David Kaye’s report on platform content regulation
    • How to Engage in Cyber Policy video series
    • Some thoughts on the updated UN Resolution on Human Rights and the Internet
    • Travel Guide to the Digital World: Cybersecurity Policy for Human Rights Defenders
  • ICANN

    The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
    (ICANN) is the organisation responsible for operating the Domain Name System (DNS), which is essentially the equivalent of the Internet’s phone book – holding the registry of all Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and domain names. It is governed by an international, multi-stakeholder community. ICANN holds three meetings each year, rotating among the different regions. For more information, see the following resources:

    • Apply for the ICANN Fellowship program if you’d like to be introduced to ICANN and want to take part in its work
    • ICANNWiki – A non-profit organisation dedicated to providing a community-developed wiki on ICANN and Internet governance
    • Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO) list of stakeholder groups and constituencies
    • GNSO document archive
    • GNSO Projects List – a compilation of all active and/or open projects within the GNSO
    • Join a group or constituency, such as the Non-Commercial Stakeholders’ Group (NCSG)
    • Join a working group – e.g., the Middle East and Adjoining Countries Strategy Working Group (MEAC-SWG)
    • Learn about how to write ICANN policy via the Noncommercial User’s Constituency’s (NCUC) Policy Writing Course
    • Participate in meetings remotely
    • Read the ICANN beginners guide
    • Submit a public comment
    • Visit ICANN Learn and take a free course
  • IEEE

    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is a professional body that primarily works at the physical (infrastructure) layer of the Internet. It develops international standards for modern telecommunications and ICT hardware, such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, and is a key area of engagement vis-à-vis strengthening Wi-Fi security standards.

  • International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions

    The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) has multiple Internet governance-related resources, including:

  • International Telecommunication Union

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is the United Nations body responsible for global radio spectrum and satellite orbit management. Working primarily at both the physical (infrastructure) and logical (protocols, standards, and applications) layers, it also develops certain technical standards that ensure networks and technologies seamlessly interconnect. Additionally, it works to improve access to ICTs to underserved communities worldwide. Key resources include:

    • Radio spectrum management
    • Reports from the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development
  • Internet Engineering Task Force

    The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is a key organization involved in the development of technical standards and protocols – the basic traffic rules of the Internet that define how information travels across the network, and who can connect to whom and to what content. Housed within the Internet Society, the work of IETF encompasses protocols that range from Internet Protocol (IP), the basic language that enables two devices to communicate, to applications like email.

  • Internet Governance Forum

    The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) is a multi-stakeholder dialogue platform held under the auspices of the United Nations. Established in 2006, it facilitates conversations and collaboration between stakeholders regarding Internet policy and emerging trends related to the Internet and information and communications technologies (ICTs) on equal footing, but does not issue recommendations. A series of national, subregional, and regional IGF initiatives (NRIs) feeds into the annual global IGF. Additional resources relevant to the IGF include:

     

    Also see: IGF Academy – it aims to foster freedom of expression on the Internet and inclusive and transparent national Internet governance and policy processes.

  • Internet Governance Project

    The Internet Governance Project (IGP) is a leading source of independent analysis of global Internet governance. It is comprised of a group of professors, postdoctoral researchers, and students hosted at the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. For more information, see the IGP guide to Internet governance.

  • Internet Society

    The Internet Society (ISOC) is a non-profit organisation that was founded in 1992 to provide leadership in Internet-related standards, education, access, and policy. It features chapters all over the world, and ISOC members are involved in every aspect of Internet governance. Some of their resources include:

  • Mozilla

    Mozilla is a non-profit technology organisation that is also heavily invested in digital policy discussions and protecting human rights online. In addition to creating technology like code, apps, and the Firefox browser, Mozilla also engages in policy development, advocacy, and curates resources like the annual Internet Health Report and related toolkits.

  • openDemocracy

    Human Rights & The Internet (HRI) is a special section of openDemocracy focusing on various technology-related rights issues.

  • Open Internet for Democracy

    The Open Internet for Democracy project is a collaborative initiative by the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), the National Democratic Institute (NDI), and the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA). It is endeavoring to build a network of open Internet advocates who champion the democratic values and principles that should guide the future development of the Internet.

    • Apply to be an Open Internet Leader
    • Democratic Principles for an Open Internet
  • Reporters Without Borders

    Reporters Without Borders (RWB), or Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF), is based in Paris, France, and promotes and defends the freedom to be informed and to inform others throughout the world. They have multiple publications, and also produce the annual World Press Freedom Index. Other resources include:

    •  Internet Governance – The Position of Reporters Without Borders
  • Reuters Institute

    The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University publishes an annual Digital News Report, which tracks digital news consumption across countries, and provides timely data and analysis for industry, regulators, and academia.

  • UNESCO

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has multiple resources that pertain to Internet freedom, freedom of expression, and more. They include:

  • Web Foundation

    Established in 2009 by the inventor of the World Wide Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the World Wide Web Foundation seeks to advance the open web as a public good and a basic right. They offer multiple resources such as research, as well as initiatives and projects including:

    •  Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) – Working to make Internet access more affordable and inclusive
    • Open Data Barometer – It measures the prevalence and impact of open data initiatives around the world
    • Open Data Charter – Guides and supports governments as they implement shared open data principles, standards and best practices
    • Open Data Labs – Employs a combination of research, incubation, training, and engagement to ensure that open data is used to address practical problems in developing and emerging economies
    • Web Index – The first measure of the web’s contribution to social, economic, and political progress, studying 86 countries across the world
    • Web We Want – a global coalition working to defend, claim, and change the future of the Web
RESOURCES
  • Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform

    UN’s Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) serves Member States, Major Groups and other stakeholders, as well as the general public, by providing wide access to information and knowledge for sustainable development, through its online Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform and social media outlets.

    The Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) seeks to provide leadership and catalyse action in promoting and coordinating implementation of internationally agreed development goals, including the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Among other mandates, it hosts the secretariat for the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), the central platform within the United Nations system for the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by Heads of State and Governments in September 2015. The 2030 Agenda is a new plan of action for people, planet and prosperity, with 17 SDGs and 169 associated targets at its core.

    The work of the Division translates into six core functions: (1) Support to UN intergovernmental processes on sustainable development; (2) Analysis and policy development; (3) Capacity development at the request of Member States; (4) Inter-agency coordination; and (5) stakeholder engagement, partnerships, communication and outreach; and (6) Knowledge management.

    • The UN System SDGs action online database is the UN family’s repository of actions, initiatives and plans on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs). It contains information made available by UN system entities. It is searchable and is regularly updated. It serves as a useful reference tool for learning about what UN system entities have been doing in support of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs).
    • The High-level Political Forum, United Nations central platform for follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals, provides for the full and effective participation of all States Members of the United Nations and States members of specialized agencies. The Forum meets annually under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council for eight days, including a three-day ministerial segment and every four years at the level of Heads of State and Government under the auspices of the General Assembly for two days.
    • Sustainable Development Goal 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. Goal 16 will be reviewed in-depth at the high-level political forum in 2019.
    • Handbook for the Preparation of Voluntary National Reviews is a handbook for country preparation and presentation of voluntary national reviews (VNRs). It should be read in conjunction with the updated Secretary-General’s proposal for voluntary common reporting guidelines for voluntary national reviews at the High-level Political Forum on sustainable development (HLPF).
  • Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN)

    Launched by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in August 2012, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) mobilizes scientific and technical expertise from academia, civil society, and the private sector in support of sustainable development problem solving at local, national, and global scales. It aims to accelerate joint learning and help to overcome the compartmentalization of technical and policy work by promoting integrated approaches to the interconnected economic, social, and environmental challenges confronting the world.

  • UNESCO's Approach to SDGs

    UNESCO’s work contributes to Goal 16 of promoting peaceful and inclusive societies, ensuring public access to information and protecting fundamental freedoms. UNESCO’s approach to media development is both knowledge-driven and context-sensitive, and it takes into account the challenges and opportunities created by the rapidly changing media environment. IPDC’s Special Initiative on Knowledge-Driven Media Development highlights the importance of generating and sharing of knowledge to advance media development, and has special relevance to an inclusive approach to strengthening journalism education worldwide. This initiative contributes to Goal 16.

  • SDG Indicators Metadata repository

    SDG Indicators metadata repository reflects the latest reference metadata information provided by the UN System and other international organisations on data and statistics for the Tier I and II indicators in the global indicator framework. Since Tier III indicators are still under methodological development, a link to the webpage that includes all available work plans is being provided. This repository will be further updated and periodically reviewed in cooperation with the respective data compilers.

  • The SDG 16 Hub

    The SDG 16 Hub was initiated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in response to an increasing demand for structured and centralised information on SDG 16 and the desire for meaningful and impactful collaboration opportunities.

    The SDG 16 Hub is not a corporate website, but a hub designed to allow all stakeholders with an interest in SDG 16 to learn about the key pillars related to SDG 16, share knowledge, and collaborate. It includes resources on SDG16 that are produced by UN agencies, governments, other stakeholders as well as multi-stakeholder initiatives.

    What does the SDG 16 Hub do?

    The SDG 16 Hub is designed to be a one-stop shop for knowledge and collaboration on SDG 16. It does so by offering the following:

    • KNOWLEDGE: A growing collection of resources on SDG 16 in a searchable database. In addition, users can browse resources by following three key questions: WHAT, WHO, HOW TO.
    • COLLABORATION: The SDG 16 Hub also hosts an interactive space to foster sharing and learning on SDG 16. Sign up today to collaborate with colleagues and partners!
  • The SDG 16 Data Initiative

    The SDG16 Data Initiative is a collective project to compile existing global data that can help track progress towards the achievement of SDG16. The recommended UN official indicators along with proposed complementary indicators are listed for each target. We have included a variety of respected data providers and sought to highlight gaps and useful alternative data sources in SDG16 target areas.

    • SDG Data Initiative Global Report aims to evaluate global progress towards realizing the 2030 Agenda’s promise of peaceful, just and inclusive societies. The Global Report provides governments, UN officials, and civil society stakeholders with a resource to help understand progress on SDG16 targets and an evidence base for them to identify gaps and shortcomings in both implementing and monitoring SDG16.
  • FOIAnet Resources for Right to Information Advocates

    FOIAnet Resources for Right to Information Advocates includes publications, model laws, training materials for the public or public officials, useful links, organisations and other resources related to the right of access to information.

    • SDG 16.10.2 – Measuring RTI implementation – FOIAnet Methodology – Based on the central methodological framework developed in the UNESCO metadata for SDG 16, and given the importance of independent civil society input into the assessment of the achievement of the SDGs, FOIAnet took the initiative to develop a concrete methodology that would guide its members to capture data on SDG 16.10.2 and provide a baseline for following years.
  • State of Access of Information in Africa

    In celebration of International Right to Information Day, the African Platform on Access to Information (APAI) Campaign and fesmedia Africa released a research study on the state of access to information in Africa. Reviewing fourteen countries, and using the expertise and experience of the APAI Working Group Members, the research provides a useful snapshot of the state of access to information on the continent while providing clear and simple summaries and infographics, measured against the APAI Declaration of Principles.
  • GFMD Member's Resources

    • Access to Information and the Sustainable Development Goals Report from Article 19 reviews the current state of the right of access to information across the world to provide a baseline for future assessments over the lifetime of the 2030 Agenda. It finds that there has been significant incorporation of the right in well over half of UN Member States. The right has now been adopted into law or policy in 118 countries around the world (61 percent of UN Member States) from the largest countries (China, India, USA, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Mexico) to some of the smallest (St Vincent and the Grenadines, Vanuatu) covering 89 percent of the world’s population. In addition, 90 countries have adopted explicit constitutional guarantees. Many countries are also implementing transparency initiatives such as e-government or open data which supplement the right but generally do not fully ensure the right of access to all information.
    • Article 19 Infographic: Progress on the right to information around the world
    • The role of the media since the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals by Zoé Titus, Strategic Coordinator of the Namibia Media Trust
    • MDIF’s literature review on Media development’s role in social, economic, and political progress.
UPDATES
ACTORS

GFMD MEMBERS

  • ARTICLE 19

    The open flow of information has been key to the Internet’s transformative effect in modern society. In order to safeguard its benefits, the right to free expression must be defended when addressing issues of content and defining the technical management of the Internet’s architecture. That’s what ARTICLE 19 focuses on in this space. It is also one of the core members behind the Working Group on Internet Governance that was established at IGF 2017 in Geneva, Switzerland. A featured resource we recommend is:

     

    Some of their other resources include:

     

    They have many more resources as well regarding the following:

  • CIMA

    The Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA) is spearheading multiple initiatives to address how journalists and media organisations can participate more meaningfully in Internet policy-related discussions. They also produce relevant guides, briefs, reports, and other resources that focus on or relate to Internet policies impacting the media, democratisation, and development sectors.It is also one of the core members behind the Working Group on Internet Governance that was established at IGF 2017 in Geneva, Switzerland. Two featured resources we recommend are:

    • Getting Involved in Internet Governance: An Introductory Guide
    • Media Development in the Digital Age: Five Ways to Engage in Internet Governance (in collaboration with ARTICLE 19)
      • Also see the GFMD webinar about this resource

     

    Other examples include:

  • DW Akademie

    Deutsche Welle (DW) Akademie provides multiple Internet governance-related resources on their #MediaDev page. A featured resource we recommend is:

    • Guidebook on Internet Governance: Media Freedom in a Connected World

     

    Others include:

    • Audience Research in Media Development: Overview, Case Studies, and Lessons Learned
    • Dossier: Digital Rights, Privacy, & Security
    • Internet governance: Why you should care
    • Media Freedom Indices in the Media Development Context: How the Different Information Tools Can Be Used
  • Free Press Unlimited

    Free Press Unlimited (FPU) has actively advocated for greater involvement of journalists and the media development community in Internet governance and policy discussions.

  • International Media Support

    International Media Support (IMS) is a Denmark-based NGO that has been significantly increased its involvement within the Internet governance ecosystem, such as within the IGF and ICANN. It is also one of the core members behind the Working Group on Internet Governance that was established at IGF 2017 in Geneva, Switzerland. Relevant resources include:

    • IMS publications
    • The battle for freedom of expression online: Where are the journalists?
  • IREX

    IREX engages in a host of activities, some of which relate to education, media literacy, and Internet freedom. They also publish a Media Sustainability Index (MSI). Other relevant resources include:

OTHER ORGANISATIONS AND INITIATIVES

  • Access Now

    Access Now is an international non-profit, human rights, public policy, and advocacy group dedicated to an open and free Internet. Access Now hosts the RightsCon Summit Series each year, and also initiated the #KeepItOn campaign against Internet shutdowns. They also produce reports and briefings, such as the following resource:

    • Proposals for Regulating Internet Apps and Services: Understanding the Digital Rights Impact of the “over-the-top” (OTT) Debate
  • Association for Progressive Communications

    The Association for Progressive Communications (APC) is an international network of organizations that was founded in 1990 to provide communication infrastructure, including Internet-based applications, to groups and individuals who work for peace, gender equality, human rights, protection of the environment, and sustainability. They have multiple publicationsand other resources relevant to journalists and media development organizations such as:

  • Best Bits

    Best Bits is a civil society network on Internet governance and Internet rights. It offers an open space where each group can present and advocate for the initiatives that they believe offer the best positive agenda for advancing broadly shared civil society interests in Internet governance. Participate by signing up for their mailing list.

  • Council of Europe

    The Council of Europe produces many relevant resources on Internet freedom, freedom of expression, algorithm transparency, and more. They also host specialised working groups, such as:

    • MSI-JOQ – Committee of Experts on Quality Journalism in the Digital Age
      • Draft recommendation on promoting a favourable environment for
        quality journalism in the digital age
      • Draft study on media and information literacy in the digital
        environment
    • MSI-AUT – Committee of Experts on Human Rights Dimensions of Automated Data Processing and Different Forms of Artificial Intelligence
  • Committee to Protect Journalists

    The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) also advocates for Internet freedom.

  • DiploFoundation and GIP Digital Watch

    DiploFoundation is a non-profit foundation established by the governments of Malta and Switzerland. Diplo works to increase the role of small and developing states, and to improve global governance and international policy development. One of its initiatives, the GIP Digital Watch observatory, is a comprehensive Internet governance and digital policy observatory that provides monthly updates about digital policy as well as tracks issues and policy developments. Some of their resources include:

  • FoME

    The Forum for Media & Development (Forum Medien und Entwicklung – FoME) is a network of German institutions and individuals active in the field of media development cooperation. In addition to hosting an annual Symposium, they also feature many relevant resources and publications. You can also join their mailing list.

  • Freedom House

    Freedom House has multiple resources relevant to Internet freedom, including:

  • GigaNET

    The Global Internet Governance Academic Network (GigaNET) is an international association of academic researchers. Members include researchers from a wide range of disciplines and locations who are contributing to research, teaching, and engagement in local, regional, and international debates on Internet governance.

  • Global Partners Digital

    Global Partners Digital (GPD) is a social purpose company working to protect and promote human rights values online, and the governance processes that uphold and further these values. Their two main priorities are to grow the number of civil society groups engaging in the internet policy and governance arena, and to make governments, public authorities, international institutions, and businesses aware of the benefits of internet policies and governance processes that promote and protect human rights. Relevant resources include:

    • A Rights-respecting Model of Online Content Regulation by Platforms
    • Content regulation laws threaten our freedom of expression. We need a new approach
    • Framework for Multistakeholder Cyber Policy Development
    • GPD’s Organisational Development Framework
    • GPD’s response to David Kaye’s report on platform content regulation
    • How to Engage in Cyber Policy video series
    • Some thoughts on the updated UN Resolution on Human Rights and the Internet
    • Travel Guide to the Digital World: Cybersecurity Policy for Human Rights Defenders
  • ICANN

    The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
    (ICANN) is the organisation responsible for operating the Domain Name System (DNS), which is essentially the equivalent of the Internet’s phone book – holding the registry of all Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and domain names. It is governed by an international, multi-stakeholder community. ICANN holds three meetings each year, rotating among the different regions. For more information, see the following resources:

    • Apply for the ICANN Fellowship program if you’d like to be introduced to ICANN and want to take part in its work
    • ICANNWiki – A non-profit organisation dedicated to providing a community-developed wiki on ICANN and Internet governance
    • Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO) list of stakeholder groups and constituencies
    • GNSO document archive
    • GNSO Projects List – a compilation of all active and/or open projects within the GNSO
    • Join a group or constituency, such as the Non-Commercial Stakeholders’ Group (NCSG)
    • Join a working group – e.g., the Middle East and Adjoining Countries Strategy Working Group (MEAC-SWG)
    • Learn about how to write ICANN policy via the Noncommercial User’s Constituency’s (NCUC) Policy Writing Course
    • Participate in meetings remotely
    • Read the ICANN beginners guide
    • Submit a public comment
    • Visit ICANN Learn and take a free course
  • IEEE

    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is a professional body that primarily works at the physical (infrastructure) layer of the Internet. It develops international standards for modern telecommunications and ICT hardware, such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, and is a key area of engagement vis-à-vis strengthening Wi-Fi security standards.

  • International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions

    The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) has multiple Internet governance-related resources, including:

  • International Telecommunication Union

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is the United Nations body responsible for global radio spectrum and satellite orbit management. Working primarily at both the physical (infrastructure) and logical (protocols, standards, and applications) layers, it also develops certain technical standards that ensure networks and technologies seamlessly interconnect. Additionally, it works to improve access to ICTs to underserved communities worldwide. Key resources include:

    • Radio spectrum management
    • Reports from the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development
  • Internet Engineering Task Force

    The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is a key organization involved in the development of technical standards and protocols – the basic traffic rules of the Internet that define how information travels across the network, and who can connect to whom and to what content. Housed within the Internet Society, the work of IETF encompasses protocols that range from Internet Protocol (IP), the basic language that enables two devices to communicate, to applications like email.

  • Internet Governance Forum

    The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) is a multi-stakeholder dialogue platform held under the auspices of the United Nations. Established in 2006, it facilitates conversations and collaboration between stakeholders regarding Internet policy and emerging trends related to the Internet and information and communications technologies (ICTs) on equal footing, but does not issue recommendations. A series of national, subregional, and regional IGF initiatives (NRIs) feeds into the annual global IGF. Additional resources relevant to the IGF include:

     

    Also see: IGF Academy – it aims to foster freedom of expression on the Internet and inclusive and transparent national Internet governance and policy processes.

  • Internet Governance Project

    The Internet Governance Project (IGP) is a leading source of independent analysis of global Internet governance. It is comprised of a group of professors, postdoctoral researchers, and students hosted at the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. For more information, see the IGP guide to Internet governance.

  • Internet Society

    The Internet Society (ISOC) is a non-profit organisation that was founded in 1992 to provide leadership in Internet-related standards, education, access, and policy. It features chapters all over the world, and ISOC members are involved in every aspect of Internet governance. Some of their resources include:

  • Mozilla

    Mozilla is a non-profit technology organisation that is also heavily invested in digital policy discussions and protecting human rights online. In addition to creating technology like code, apps, and the Firefox browser, Mozilla also engages in policy development, advocacy, and curates resources like the annual Internet Health Report and related toolkits.

  • openDemocracy

    Human Rights & The Internet (HRI) is a special section of openDemocracy focusing on various technology-related rights issues.

  • Open Internet for Democracy

    The Open Internet for Democracy project is a collaborative initiative by the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), the National Democratic Institute (NDI), and the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA). It is endeavoring to build a network of open Internet advocates who champion the democratic values and principles that should guide the future development of the Internet.

    • Apply to be an Open Internet Leader
    • Democratic Principles for an Open Internet
  • Reporters Without Borders

    Reporters Without Borders (RWB), or Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF), is based in Paris, France, and promotes and defends the freedom to be informed and to inform others throughout the world. They have multiple publications, and also produce the annual World Press Freedom Index. Other resources include:

    •  Internet Governance – The Position of Reporters Without Borders
  • Reuters Institute

    The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University publishes an annual Digital News Report, which tracks digital news consumption across countries, and provides timely data and analysis for industry, regulators, and academia.

  • UNESCO

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has multiple resources that pertain to Internet freedom, freedom of expression, and more. They include:

  • Web Foundation

    Established in 2009 by the inventor of the World Wide Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the World Wide Web Foundation seeks to advance the open web as a public good and a basic right. They offer multiple resources such as research, as well as initiatives and projects including:

    •  Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) – Working to make Internet access more affordable and inclusive
    • Open Data Barometer – It measures the prevalence and impact of open data initiatives around the world
    • Open Data Charter – Guides and supports governments as they implement shared open data principles, standards and best practices
    • Open Data Labs – Employs a combination of research, incubation, training, and engagement to ensure that open data is used to address practical problems in developing and emerging economies
    • Web Index – The first measure of the web’s contribution to social, economic, and political progress, studying 86 countries across the world
    • Web We Want – a global coalition working to defend, claim, and change the future of the Web