• Free Press Unlimited Gender Equality Policy

    Free Press Unlimited believes that gender equality is central to achieving its overall long-term objective that media and journalists constitute a diverse and professional media landscape and function as change agents. Free Press Unlimited Gender Equality Policy is supported by a Gender Implementation Plan that will guide Free Press Unlimited in translating the policy into operational plans, instruments and tools linked to results and targets. All staff members are accountable for the implementation of the principles and standards presented in this policy.

  • BBC Media Action's Gender Equality Toolkit

    This site gives practical advice on women’s rights and gender equality to project managers and programme makers. The overarching aim is to equip users to challenge gender stereotypes and serve both men and women equally.

    Through reflecting and deepening inequalities between men and women, the media bear some responsibility for these problems. For instance, politics shows in many countries still feature men talking to men about men. Women in films get fewer lines and are less likely to be cast as leaders than their male counterparts.

    Yet the media can also be a champion of gender equality. See how BBC Media Action achieve this in their projects.

  • ECPMF's Women’s Reporting Point

    Many journalists get attacked because of their profession. But female journalists often have to face different forms of violence than men: threats of rape or sexual and abusive comments are gender-based and hit women more often. As a reaction to these specific circumstances, European Centre for Press and Media Freedom has launched an alarm centre for female media workers, where they can inform the Centre about attacks against them and seek help or advice.

    ECPMF encourages all women to report attacks: not only to seek help, but also to make the dimension of attacks against journalists visible. ECPMF will collect the cases reported in a database – with details of the woman’s identity removed in order to protect her – as the basis for an analysis to show the scale of the problem across Europe.

  • ECPMF's Resource Centre

    The online Media Freedom Resource Centre is an open and ever growing platform providing access to curated contents related to media freedom and pluralism in Europe. Items range from reports to academic sources, from legal tools to practical instruments such as trainings and manuals, as well as opportunities for media professionals and young journalists.

    Click here to go through their reports and publications focusing on gender and inequality.

  • IWMF: Training, opportunity and safety resources for female journalists

    There are few fields where workers routinely face harassment, physical and online attacks, arrests, lawsuits, eviction, equipment theft and more – all simply for doing their jobs. And with growing threats against press freedom, female journalists often feel the brunt of these attacks. As if the trauma isn’t enough, incidents are often accompanied by medical bills, legal fees, and other unexpected costs that can be devastating to a working journalist.

    IWMF offers safety training, reporting trips, and byline opportunities, all tailored to female journalists — both established, and up-and-coming. See their list of resources here.

    Reports:

    Attacks and Harassment: The Impact on Female Journalists and Their Reporting

    Violence and Harassment against Women in the News Media: A Global Picture

    Global Report on the Status of Women in the News Media

  • WAN-IFRA: latest reports and data on gender equality in the media

    The Women in News resource center features the latest reports and data on gender equality in the media, as well as practical tools to help media managers create environments for their female talent to succeed. All materials may be accessed free of charge.

    In 2017, the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements placed the problem of sexual harassment firmly in the spotlight. First launched in the United States, they have evolved into global campaigns that cut across borders, industries, race, cultures and gender.

    Click here for a practical guide by WAN-IFRA for both media organisations and media employees to help them to prevent and deal with sexual harassment at work. It is hopefully a first step in the journey towards a media industry that is free from sexual harassment, setting standards of best practice that can be replicated across industries globally.

  • Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma: Resources for Sexual Violence

    Reporting on sexual assault means finding not only the right language but the context and sensitivity to communicate a trauma that is at once deeply personal yet also a matter of public policy; immediate and yet freighted with centuries of stigma, silence and suppression. Reporting on sexual violence requires special ethical sensitivity, interviewing skills, and knowledge about victims, perpetrators, law and psychology.

    The Dart Center provides journalists around the world with the resources necessary to meet this challenge, drawing on a global, interdisciplinary network of news professionals, mental health experts, educators and researchers.

    Click here for access to the Dart Center resources on sexual violence.

    Video: Let’s Talk: Personal Boundaries, Safety & Women in Journalism

    Tip sheet offering strategies for recognizing, mitigating and addressing sexual harassment and other predatory behavior while reporting

  • IMS Publications

    IMS publishes material such as media sector assessments, handbooks on journalism, and briefing papers on topical issues related to media to promote freedom of expression and to help develop free and professional media worldwide.

    Publications on women in media include Gender in the Myanmar Media Landscape and Baseline study on the working conditions of Somali women journalists.

  • Internews Gender Equality Policy

    Internews’ global Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Strategy, has been designed to improve their programs as well as internal governance to challenge discriminatory gender norms and advance equality across gender identities. This strategy builds from their Women’s Initiative launched in 2015, expanding that work to guide their internal operations and program approaches. A truly global strategy, it is built on over two years of deep and experienced input from more than 100 of the organisation’s staff and partners in their US and UK headquarters, as well as in numerous countries around the world.

  • Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

    Report on Countering Online Abuse of Female Journalists, by the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media.

  • European Parliamentary Research Service Blog

    The European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) provides comprehensive research and analytical support to the Members of the European Parliament, its parliamentary committees and the European Parliament as a whole.

    EU Briefings:

    Gender Equality In The EU’s Digital And Media Sectors

    Spotlight On Gender Equality In The Media And Digital Sectors

  • Who Makes the News and the Gender in Media Monitoring Project

    Who Makes the News (WMTN) is a knowledge, information and resource portal on media, gender and other axes of discrimination. It hosts the Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP), the world’s largest and longest running research and advocacy initiative that seeks to advance gender equality in and through the news media.

    Learning Resource Kit for Gender-Ethical Journalism and Media House Policy

  • UN Women: raising awareness of gender equality in the media

    UN Women looks for opportunities to raise awareness of gender equality among members of the media, including through special workshops and toolkits, so they can begin to practice gender-sensitive reporting. They advocate for more women to work in the media, including in leadership positions. Support for women’s advocates helps them develop communications and media skills so that they can effectively engage with journalists.

    Click here for their work on raising awareness of gender equality among members of the media.

  • CFI

    The “Media and Development” programme helps media organisations to take ownership of development issues (education, health, gender) by strengthening the relationship of trust between journalists and civil society.

  • WAN-IFRA: Women in News

    Women in News (WIN) aims to increase women’s leadership and voices in the news. It does so by equipping women journalists and editors with the skills, strategies, and support networks to take on greater leadership positions within their media. In parallel, WIN partners with media organisations to identify industry-led solutions to close the gender gap in their newsrooms, boardrooms and in the content they produce.

    WIN is currently working with more than 80 media from 12 countries throughout Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East including: Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Somalia, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe (WIN Africa) and  Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Palestine (WIN MENA). WIN Southeast Asia launched in early 2018.

  • Media Diversity Institute | MDI

    The Media Diversity Institute (MDI) works internationally to encourage and facilitate responsible media coverage of diversity. It aims to prevent the media from intentionally or unintentionally spreading prejudice, intolerance and hatred which can lead to social tensions, disputes and violent conflict. MDI encourages instead, fair, accurate, inclusive and sensitive media coverage in order to promote understanding between different groups and cultures.

  • International Women's Media Foundation | IWMF

    The IWMF works to unleash the power of female journalists to transform the global news media. Our fellows and grantees — both freelance and staff journalists — become experts in reporting in underserved regions, generate must-read stories, align with top outlets, and bring critical issues affecting women and others to light. We are the only organization that provides safety training, byline opportunities, and emergency support tailored to female journalists and photographers around the world.

    We also recognize badass female journalists and photographers whose courage sets them apart. And we research the factors that allow journalism to remain dominated by men — while advocating for inclusive practices that help propel women and minorities into leadership.

  • Internews

    We believe that the empowerment of women and girls is a prerequisite for equal rights for all. But all over the world, women and girls’ voices are often ignored or invisible in the media, with far less content featuring their voices and views – just 10% of all news stories globally focus on women or girls, and roughly 80% of the “experts” interviewed by the news media are men. Women are also dramatically underrepresented in the industry itself. Globally, only 27% of the top management jobs in the media sector are occupied by women. Among reporters, it’s only 36%. And women and girls experience more intense online harassment, including sexual harassment.

  • Fondation Hirondelle

    In countries where Fondation Hirondelle works, women and girls face specific challenges participating in public life. In conflict settings, not only are they disproportionately impacted by violence, but they are also often excluded from official peace processes, despite global consensus on the fundamental need for women to fully participate. Moreover, in many contexts, the rights of women are not respected or well understood by populations: women are often confronted with sexual and gender-based violence, early marriage or unequal access to education or health care.

    Independent local and national media have a role to play in ensuring that the role of women in peace processes is on the agenda, in shifting perceptions and norms, and in ensuring their views and voices are taken into account. Professional and independent broadcast journalism can support ensuring women’s rights by helping raise awareness, increase knowledge of options available, and increase commitment among decision makers for concrete steps. Reporting on issues of concern to women such as education, customary rights and domestic abuse supports women’s empowerment and participation in public life.

  • Free Press Unlimited

    Free Press Unlimited believes that gender equality is essential in achieving a diverse and professional media landscape where journalists function as change agents. Journalists and media workers contribute to the overall vision of a just, inclusive and peaceful society. To men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

    Gender inequalities manifest not only in the way women and men relate on the work floor or by the numbers on their pay checks. There is also still a huge imbalance in how women and men are represented and portrayed in media content. Too often, media content still portrays women as the weaker sex, either as a victim of violence, or as an object of beauty and fashion. Men on the other hand are still believed to be the stronger sex, always in control and responsible for bringing in the money.

    Our long term objective is that media and journalists constitute a diverse and professional media landscape, and function as agents of change. We believe gender equality is central to achieving this overall goal

  • International Media Support IMS

    We work to enable local media to reduce conflict, strengthen democracy and facilitate dialogue

  • European Federation of Journalists | EFJ

    The EFJ is an organisation where solidarity between organisations and individuals from the Federation is fundamental. Everyone has the right to be treated with dignity, equality and respect. Any kind of behaviour, such as discrimination, bullying, harassment (sexual, physical or otherwise) or intimidation that undermines these basic rights is not acceptable.

  • BBC Media Action

    BBC Media Action is committed to advancing gender equality. We work with the power of media and communication to support more equal societies where all people are treated fairly, enjoy the same access to opportunity and do not face discrimination or violence because of their gender.

    All BBC Media Action projects strive to give women equal voice and increase balanced and meaningful representation of women in the media (on and off camera) and in social discourse. In addition, targeted gender equality projects aim to deliver transformative change in key impact areas where tackling inequality can bring about substantial progress for women.

    In particular, BBC Media Action uses media and communication to tackle gender based violence, support women’s’ economic empowerment, create space for women in political and social leadership, increase women’s access to justice and to support women and girls to access their rights to quality education and health.12 These gender focussed projects systematically address the root causes of inequality between men and women by challenging discriminatory relations, norms and practices and empowering women and men to drive transformative change.

  • IREX

    Identity-based inequities are obstacles to development at all levels of society. We employ a Gender Equality and Social Inclusion (GESI) framework across all of our work to engage staff, partners, participants, and alumni in discussions about reducing identity-based discrimination and marginalization in their communities and institutions.

RESOURCES
  • Free Press Unlimited Gender Equality Policy

    Free Press Unlimited believes that gender equality is central to achieving its overall long-term objective that media and journalists constitute a diverse and professional media landscape and function as change agents. Free Press Unlimited Gender Equality Policy is supported by a Gender Implementation Plan that will guide Free Press Unlimited in translating the policy into operational plans, instruments and tools linked to results and targets. All staff members are accountable for the implementation of the principles and standards presented in this policy.

  • BBC Media Action's Gender Equality Toolkit

    This site gives practical advice on women’s rights and gender equality to project managers and programme makers. The overarching aim is to equip users to challenge gender stereotypes and serve both men and women equally.

    Through reflecting and deepening inequalities between men and women, the media bear some responsibility for these problems. For instance, politics shows in many countries still feature men talking to men about men. Women in films get fewer lines and are less likely to be cast as leaders than their male counterparts.

    Yet the media can also be a champion of gender equality. See how BBC Media Action achieve this in their projects.

  • ECPMF's Women’s Reporting Point

    Many journalists get attacked because of their profession. But female journalists often have to face different forms of violence than men: threats of rape or sexual and abusive comments are gender-based and hit women more often. As a reaction to these specific circumstances, European Centre for Press and Media Freedom has launched an alarm centre for female media workers, where they can inform the Centre about attacks against them and seek help or advice.

    ECPMF encourages all women to report attacks: not only to seek help, but also to make the dimension of attacks against journalists visible. ECPMF will collect the cases reported in a database – with details of the woman’s identity removed in order to protect her – as the basis for an analysis to show the scale of the problem across Europe.

  • ECPMF's Resource Centre

    The online Media Freedom Resource Centre is an open and ever growing platform providing access to curated contents related to media freedom and pluralism in Europe. Items range from reports to academic sources, from legal tools to practical instruments such as trainings and manuals, as well as opportunities for media professionals and young journalists.

    Click here to go through their reports and publications focusing on gender and inequality.

  • IWMF: Training, opportunity and safety resources for female journalists

    There are few fields where workers routinely face harassment, physical and online attacks, arrests, lawsuits, eviction, equipment theft and more – all simply for doing their jobs. And with growing threats against press freedom, female journalists often feel the brunt of these attacks. As if the trauma isn’t enough, incidents are often accompanied by medical bills, legal fees, and other unexpected costs that can be devastating to a working journalist.

    IWMF offers safety training, reporting trips, and byline opportunities, all tailored to female journalists — both established, and up-and-coming. See their list of resources here.

    Reports:

    Attacks and Harassment: The Impact on Female Journalists and Their Reporting

    Violence and Harassment against Women in the News Media: A Global Picture

    Global Report on the Status of Women in the News Media

  • WAN-IFRA: latest reports and data on gender equality in the media

    The Women in News resource center features the latest reports and data on gender equality in the media, as well as practical tools to help media managers create environments for their female talent to succeed. All materials may be accessed free of charge.

    In 2017, the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements placed the problem of sexual harassment firmly in the spotlight. First launched in the United States, they have evolved into global campaigns that cut across borders, industries, race, cultures and gender.

    Click here for a practical guide by WAN-IFRA for both media organisations and media employees to help them to prevent and deal with sexual harassment at work. It is hopefully a first step in the journey towards a media industry that is free from sexual harassment, setting standards of best practice that can be replicated across industries globally.

  • Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma: Resources for Sexual Violence

    Reporting on sexual assault means finding not only the right language but the context and sensitivity to communicate a trauma that is at once deeply personal yet also a matter of public policy; immediate and yet freighted with centuries of stigma, silence and suppression. Reporting on sexual violence requires special ethical sensitivity, interviewing skills, and knowledge about victims, perpetrators, law and psychology.

    The Dart Center provides journalists around the world with the resources necessary to meet this challenge, drawing on a global, interdisciplinary network of news professionals, mental health experts, educators and researchers.

    Click here for access to the Dart Center resources on sexual violence.

    Video: Let’s Talk: Personal Boundaries, Safety & Women in Journalism

    Tip sheet offering strategies for recognizing, mitigating and addressing sexual harassment and other predatory behavior while reporting

  • IMS Publications

    IMS publishes material such as media sector assessments, handbooks on journalism, and briefing papers on topical issues related to media to promote freedom of expression and to help develop free and professional media worldwide.

    Publications on women in media include Gender in the Myanmar Media Landscape and Baseline study on the working conditions of Somali women journalists.

  • Internews Gender Equality Policy

    Internews’ global Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Strategy, has been designed to improve their programs as well as internal governance to challenge discriminatory gender norms and advance equality across gender identities. This strategy builds from their Women’s Initiative launched in 2015, expanding that work to guide their internal operations and program approaches. A truly global strategy, it is built on over two years of deep and experienced input from more than 100 of the organisation’s staff and partners in their US and UK headquarters, as well as in numerous countries around the world.

  • Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

    Report on Countering Online Abuse of Female Journalists, by the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media.

  • European Parliamentary Research Service Blog

    The European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) provides comprehensive research and analytical support to the Members of the European Parliament, its parliamentary committees and the European Parliament as a whole.

    EU Briefings:

    Gender Equality In The EU’s Digital And Media Sectors

    Spotlight On Gender Equality In The Media And Digital Sectors

  • Who Makes the News and the Gender in Media Monitoring Project

    Who Makes the News (WMTN) is a knowledge, information and resource portal on media, gender and other axes of discrimination. It hosts the Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP), the world’s largest and longest running research and advocacy initiative that seeks to advance gender equality in and through the news media.

    Learning Resource Kit for Gender-Ethical Journalism and Media House Policy

  • UN Women: raising awareness of gender equality in the media

    UN Women looks for opportunities to raise awareness of gender equality among members of the media, including through special workshops and toolkits, so they can begin to practice gender-sensitive reporting. They advocate for more women to work in the media, including in leadership positions. Support for women’s advocates helps them develop communications and media skills so that they can effectively engage with journalists.

    Click here for their work on raising awareness of gender equality among members of the media.

UPDATES
ACTORS
  • CFI

    The “Media and Development” programme helps media organisations to take ownership of development issues (education, health, gender) by strengthening the relationship of trust between journalists and civil society.

  • WAN-IFRA: Women in News

    Women in News (WIN) aims to increase women’s leadership and voices in the news. It does so by equipping women journalists and editors with the skills, strategies, and support networks to take on greater leadership positions within their media. In parallel, WIN partners with media organisations to identify industry-led solutions to close the gender gap in their newsrooms, boardrooms and in the content they produce.

    WIN is currently working with more than 80 media from 12 countries throughout Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East including: Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Somalia, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe (WIN Africa) and  Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Palestine (WIN MENA). WIN Southeast Asia launched in early 2018.

  • Media Diversity Institute | MDI

    The Media Diversity Institute (MDI) works internationally to encourage and facilitate responsible media coverage of diversity. It aims to prevent the media from intentionally or unintentionally spreading prejudice, intolerance and hatred which can lead to social tensions, disputes and violent conflict. MDI encourages instead, fair, accurate, inclusive and sensitive media coverage in order to promote understanding between different groups and cultures.

  • International Women's Media Foundation | IWMF

    The IWMF works to unleash the power of female journalists to transform the global news media. Our fellows and grantees — both freelance and staff journalists — become experts in reporting in underserved regions, generate must-read stories, align with top outlets, and bring critical issues affecting women and others to light. We are the only organization that provides safety training, byline opportunities, and emergency support tailored to female journalists and photographers around the world.

    We also recognize badass female journalists and photographers whose courage sets them apart. And we research the factors that allow journalism to remain dominated by men — while advocating for inclusive practices that help propel women and minorities into leadership.

  • Internews

    We believe that the empowerment of women and girls is a prerequisite for equal rights for all. But all over the world, women and girls’ voices are often ignored or invisible in the media, with far less content featuring their voices and views – just 10% of all news stories globally focus on women or girls, and roughly 80% of the “experts” interviewed by the news media are men. Women are also dramatically underrepresented in the industry itself. Globally, only 27% of the top management jobs in the media sector are occupied by women. Among reporters, it’s only 36%. And women and girls experience more intense online harassment, including sexual harassment.

  • Fondation Hirondelle

    In countries where Fondation Hirondelle works, women and girls face specific challenges participating in public life. In conflict settings, not only are they disproportionately impacted by violence, but they are also often excluded from official peace processes, despite global consensus on the fundamental need for women to fully participate. Moreover, in many contexts, the rights of women are not respected or well understood by populations: women are often confronted with sexual and gender-based violence, early marriage or unequal access to education or health care.

    Independent local and national media have a role to play in ensuring that the role of women in peace processes is on the agenda, in shifting perceptions and norms, and in ensuring their views and voices are taken into account. Professional and independent broadcast journalism can support ensuring women’s rights by helping raise awareness, increase knowledge of options available, and increase commitment among decision makers for concrete steps. Reporting on issues of concern to women such as education, customary rights and domestic abuse supports women’s empowerment and participation in public life.

  • Free Press Unlimited

    Free Press Unlimited believes that gender equality is essential in achieving a diverse and professional media landscape where journalists function as change agents. Journalists and media workers contribute to the overall vision of a just, inclusive and peaceful society. To men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

    Gender inequalities manifest not only in the way women and men relate on the work floor or by the numbers on their pay checks. There is also still a huge imbalance in how women and men are represented and portrayed in media content. Too often, media content still portrays women as the weaker sex, either as a victim of violence, or as an object of beauty and fashion. Men on the other hand are still believed to be the stronger sex, always in control and responsible for bringing in the money.

    Our long term objective is that media and journalists constitute a diverse and professional media landscape, and function as agents of change. We believe gender equality is central to achieving this overall goal

  • International Media Support IMS

    We work to enable local media to reduce conflict, strengthen democracy and facilitate dialogue

  • European Federation of Journalists | EFJ

    The EFJ is an organisation where solidarity between organisations and individuals from the Federation is fundamental. Everyone has the right to be treated with dignity, equality and respect. Any kind of behaviour, such as discrimination, bullying, harassment (sexual, physical or otherwise) or intimidation that undermines these basic rights is not acceptable.

  • BBC Media Action

    BBC Media Action is committed to advancing gender equality. We work with the power of media and communication to support more equal societies where all people are treated fairly, enjoy the same access to opportunity and do not face discrimination or violence because of their gender.

    All BBC Media Action projects strive to give women equal voice and increase balanced and meaningful representation of women in the media (on and off camera) and in social discourse. In addition, targeted gender equality projects aim to deliver transformative change in key impact areas where tackling inequality can bring about substantial progress for women.

    In particular, BBC Media Action uses media and communication to tackle gender based violence, support women’s’ economic empowerment, create space for women in political and social leadership, increase women’s access to justice and to support women and girls to access their rights to quality education and health.12 These gender focussed projects systematically address the root causes of inequality between men and women by challenging discriminatory relations, norms and practices and empowering women and men to drive transformative change.

  • IREX

    Identity-based inequities are obstacles to development at all levels of society. We employ a Gender Equality and Social Inclusion (GESI) framework across all of our work to engage staff, partners, participants, and alumni in discussions about reducing identity-based discrimination and marginalization in their communities and institutions.